Christmas Posting Dates
Fell: Feral City v. 1

Fell: Feral City v. 1

Book rating: 05 Paperback

By (author) Warren Ellis, By (artist) Ben Templesmith

$12.47
List price $17.22
You save $4.75 27% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 1 business day
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: Image Comics
  • Format: Paperback | 128 pages
  • Dimensions: 171mm x 260mm x 8mm | 317g
  • Publication date: 5 June 2007
  • Publication City/Country: Fullerton
  • ISBN 10: 1582406936
  • ISBN 13: 9781582406930
  • Illustrations note: chiefly col. Illustrations
  • Sales rank: 30,070

Product description

Detective Richard Fell is transferred over the bridge from the big city to Snowtown, a feral district whose police investigations department numbers three and a half people (one detective has no legs). Dumped in this collapsing urban trashzone, Richard Fell is starting all over again. In a place where nothing seems to make any sense, Fell clings to the one thing he knows to be true: everybody's hiding something.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Customer reviews

By 365 Graphic Novels 08 Apr 2012 5

This is an absolutely cracking read. If it were a novel it would be a New York Times bestseller. Detective Richard Fell is transferred to "Snowtown;" a wretched hive of scum and villainy if ever there was one. Over eight self-contained but linked stories we see him investigate bizarre and sickening cases as he struggles to bring a little light to the darkness of this feral city.

You are appalled and enthralled in equal measure as you discover the tragedy and comedy that Snowtown throws up. Although many of the crimes seem abhorrent and outlandish, thus perfect comic book material, you do suspect that Ellis probably plucked them straight from the newspapers. Snowtown could easily be a warning or prophesy of where our dehumanised inner-cities are heading.

The art is quite stylised and almost childlike but perfectly captures the greasy semi-noir feel of the setting. Everything is dingy and grimy and you can almost feel the despair oozing from the shadows onto your fingers as you read. Everything has that washed out feel but certain highlights such as a person's hair or a bloodstain are picked out in more vivid colours as if you were remembering rather than reading each scene.

This is an excellent story that really sucks you in featuring whisky enemas, geriatric suicide bombers and the real cream of Ellis' unbridled imagination. Although this is marked as volume one there was sadly never a volume two as it really leaves you wanting more.