Farmer Duck

Farmer Duck

Paperback

By (author) Martin Waddell, Illustrated by Helen Oxenbury

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  • Publisher: Walker Books Ltd
  • Format: Paperback | 40 pages
  • Dimensions: 222mm x 242mm x 4mm | 200g
  • Publication date: 4 September 1995
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 074453660X
  • ISBN 13: 9780744536607
  • Edition: New edition
  • Edition statement: New edition
  • Illustrations note: colour illustrations
  • Sales rank: 19,834

Product description

"Farmer Duck" is an amusing fable. Martin Waddell's awards include the Smarties Book Prize for "Can't You Sleep, Little Bear?", and "Farmer Duck", the Emil/Kurt Maschler Award for "The Park in the Dark" and the Best Books for Babies Award for "Rosies Babies". His other books include "The Big Big Sea", "Owl Babies", "Let's Go Home Little Bear", "John Joe and the Hen" and the "Little Dracula" books. Helen Oxenbury won the Kate Greenaway Medal in 1979, and her books include "Animal Allsorts" and "Curious Creatures". She has three times been Highly Commended for the Kate Greenaway Medal, and three times won the Smarties Book Prize, for "Farmer Duck, "We're Going on a Bear Hunt" and "So Much".

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Editorial reviews

A faithful duck labors while the indolent farmer lazes in bed, eating candy and occasionally inquiring, "How goes the work?" - to which the duck replies, "Quack!" When the duck grows "sleepy and weepy and tired," the other animals hatch a plan, succinctly expressed: "Moo!" "Baa!" "Cluck!" They enter the house, climb the stairs, tip the sleeping farmer out of his bed and chase him away forever. Come morning, the duck arrives to slave alone as usual but finds the other animals eager to pitch in. The sanctimonious moral of "The Little Red Hen" gets a salutary restructuring here, with the focus on the duck's uncomplaining toil and the other animals' generosity. Waddell's narration is a marvel of simplicity and compact grace; Oxenbury's soft pencil and watercolor illustrations have the comic impact of masterly cartoons, while her sweeping color and light are gloriously evocative of the English farm scene. Like Waddell's Can't You Sleep Little Bear? (p. 58): a book with all the marks of a nursery classic. (Kirkus Reviews)