The Eye of the World

The Eye of the World

Book rating: 05 Paperback The Wheel of Time

By (author) Robert Jordan

List price $15.61

Unavailable - AbeBooks may have this title.

Additional formats available

Format
Hardback $27.10
Paperback $11.62
  • Publisher: Orbit
  • Format: Paperback | 832 pages
  • Dimensions: 110mm x 178mm x 40mm | 358g
  • Publication date: 12 December 1991
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 1857230760
  • ISBN 13: 9781857230765
  • Illustrations note: 4pp maps
  • Sales rank: 2,725

Product description

Life in Emond's Field has been pretty boring for Rand Al'Thor and his friends until a strange young woman arrives in their village. Moraine is an Aes Sedai, a magician with the ability to wield the One Power, and she brings warnings of a terrible evil awakening in the world. That very night, the village is attacked by bloodthirsty Trollocs - a fearsome tribe of beast-men thought to be no more than myth. As Emond's Field burns, Moraine and her warrior-guardian help Rand and his companions to escape. But it is only the beginning of their troubles. For Moraine believes Rand Al'Thor is the Dragon Reborn, and that he is fated to unite the world against the rising darkness and lead the fight against a being so powerful and evil it is known simply as the Dark One. Part One of the opening volume to Robert Jordan's classic Wheel of Time series, The Eye of the World continues with TO THE BLIGHT, also available in March 2003.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Author information

Robert Jordan was born in 1948 in Charleston. He was a graduate of the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a degree in physics, and served 2 tours in Vietnam. His hobbies inc. hunting, fishing, sailing, poker, chess, pool and pipe collecting. He died in September 2007.

Customer reviews

By Bruno Miguel Correia Azevedo 01 Nov 2013 5

This is just the beginning of the most epic adventure ever

By Thomas Platt 27 Aug 2010 5

For myself, this is where it all began. The Eye of the World, the first book in Robert Jordan's wonderful saga, was the first book I ever loved.

The story begins, like many, in a quiet town of little consequence. But oh, how the scale and excitement grow after this humble beginning.

The main character, Rand al'Thor, is one you will quickly feel real emotion for. Even in the later books (be warned, this is a well-established and somewhat lengthy series of novels) I always feel a great thrill when reading of his adventures in particular. That is not to say, though, that the other characters are any less absorbing! The books have quite a wide selection of characters, male and female, and many have entire chapters where the story is told from their individual perspectives; although the books are told mostly from the eyes of a specific few. Each has their own ambitions, responsibilities or destiny, and they all blend together to give a truly wonderful and wide-angled view of the unfolding events in the rich world that Jordan (author) creates.

The story itself is one of magic, prophecy and a good old struggle between good and evil. It's creative and inspiring, and most importantly, exciting. You'll really *care* about the characters, and thrill as the story twists and turns. It comes with my absolute highest recommendation.

Review quote

On very rare occasions, very talented storytellers create worlds that are beyond fantasy; worlds that become realities. Robert Jordan has - MORGAN LLYWELYN Epic in every sense THE TIMES [With} The Wheel of Time, Jordan has come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal THE NEW YORK TIMES The Eye of the World and its sequels in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series show the extent to which one can go with a traditional fantasy framework, with added gusto. Stock elements are abound: a reluctant hero--in fact five humble village folk--plucke To his publisher's credit, Jordan's books are fortunate among fantasy novels in not having covers that look like an explosion of a teenager's bedroom. The absence of such lurid artwork is, perhaps, part of their appeal.'

Editorial reviews

Vast, improbable fantasy that touches all the standard bases, with an unimpressive though complicated good. vs.-evil/cyclic-history backdrop. Upon peaceful, bucolic Emond's Field suddenly descends a horde of bestial, vicious Trollocs directed by sinister shadowy Fades at the behest of the Evil One. Their targets are three young men: sheepherder Rand, blacksmith Perrin, prankster Mat; all three miraculously escape. Also on hand are Moiraine, a well-dressed lady of the Aes Sedai (those who can tap the One Power to work magic) and her sidekick, the warrior Lan. Clearly, the only safe place for the three is Tar Valon, the magically defended city of the Aes Sedai. So, accompanied by the village Wisdom (witch) Nynaeve and her apprentice Egwene, they all set off. After some adventures and hairsbreadth escapes - the usual heroic-travelogue padding - they join up with a cuddly giant Ogier, Loial, who takes them through magical tunnels to see the Green Man. Nearby is the Eye of the World, which the Evil One fears: it's a source of power to be used against him. Finally, some sort of ethereal battle ensues, as Rand taps the power of the Eye to destroy the Evil One without quite knowing how. Neither will his readers. Despite one or two encouraging signs of inventiveness: portentous, ponderous, and contrived, with a rationale that's not even half worked out. (Kirkus Reviews)