The English Musical Renaissance, 1840-1940
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The English Musical Renaissance, 1840-1940 : Constructing a National Music

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Description

Second edition of a book which caused huge controversy in its first printing - now completely revised and updated. Argues that research into the cultural history of music can significantly help our understanding of the evolution of English national identity. Only book of its kind to cover such a revolutionary period in British music. Looks at how music reflected the privileged elite, ignoring the vast majority of 'music lovers', and was crucial in the construction of a British national identity. The second edition features a new and expanded introduction, a new chapter on Mendelssohn's Elijah - and the complete text has also been updated and revised.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 140 x 214 x 26mm | 499.99g
  • MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Manchester, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised
  • 2nd Revised edition
  • Illustrations, black & white
  • 0719058309
  • 9780719058301
  • 954,194

About Meirion Hughes

Meirion Hughes is a freelance historian and lives in London. Robert Stradling was Professor of History at the University of Wales, Cardiff

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Table of contents

Part one: The history and politics of the Renaissance 1. Renaissance and Reformation (1840-94) 2. A troubled inheritance (1895-1914) 3. War, post-war, pre-war, more war (1914-40) Part two: Aspects of cultural formation 4. Being beastly to the Hun 5. Crusading for national music 6. Slaying the false prophets 7. Becoming transfigured

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Review quote

"'Our music, as at the Proms, confirms an ironic chauvinism or encourages a cosy insularity. This book, very eloquently, sets it all down.' Anthony Burgess; 'A quite remarkable book, remarkable in its wealth of cultural cross-reference and in the bouncy exuberance with which it is written... An invaluable correction to all that has gone before.' English Historical Review"

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