The End of Roman Britain

The End of Roman Britain

Paperback

By (author) Michael E. Jones

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  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • Format: Paperback | 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 154mm x 226mm x 22mm | 481g
  • Publication date: 2 April 1998
  • Publication City/Country: Ithaca
  • ISBN 10: 0801485304
  • ISBN 13: 9780801485305
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Illustrations note: 13
  • Sales rank: 1,148,102

Product description

Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization. To explain why this was true, Jones offers an analysis of the economic, social, military and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans. Drawing on literary sources and archaeological evidence, he disputes the theory that the Anglo-Saxon invasions were the determining agent in the failure of Romanitas.

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Review quote

"An exciting, imaginative, and original examination of a significant historical problem. Michael Jones's thesis, that Roman Britain fell not because Rome abandoned Britain but because the Britons rejected Rome, is certain to provoke controversy. The book is written in a witty and engaging style." Richard Abels, United States Naval Academy"

Back cover copy

Britain was never as thoroughly conquered as traditional historians would have us believe, according to Michael E. Jones. Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization. To explain why this was true, Jones offers a lucid and thorough analysis of the economic, social, military, and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans. Drawing on literary sources and on recent archaeological evidence, Jones disputes the theory that the Anglo-Saxon invasions were the determining agent in the failure of Romanitas. He argues instead that the success of the new warriors was a symptom of the inherent weakness of Romano-British society. Problems late in the era may have been worsened significantly by changes in the natural environment, such as climatic deterioration associated with harvest failure, famine, and changes in migration patterns.