The Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism: The Origins of Apocalypticism in Judaism and Christianity v.1

The Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism: The Origins of Apocalypticism in Judaism and Christianity v.1

Paperback Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism (Paperback)

Edited by Bernard McGinn, Edited by Etc., Edited by John J. Collins, Edited by Stephen J. Stein

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  • Publisher: Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd.
  • Format: Paperback | 520 pages
  • Dimensions: 145mm x 229mm x 41mm | 816g
  • Publication date: 1 March 2000
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 082641253X
  • ISBN 13: 9780826412539
  • Edition: Annotated
  • Edition statement: annotated edition
  • Illustrations note: illustrations
  • Sales rank: 398,740

Product description

Apocalyptism has been broadly defined as the belief that God has revealed the imminent end of the ongoing struggle between good and evil throughout history. It has been a major element in the three monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and extensive scholarship has been devoted to apocalyptic study during the latter half of the 20th century. With contributions from 42 scholars, this encyclopedia in three volumes provides a comprehensive survey of apocalypticism's role in Western history from its origins down to the eve of the third millennium.

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Author information

John J. Collins is Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale University Divinity School. Bernard McGinn is the Naomi Shenstone Donnelly Professor Historical Theology and the History of Christianity at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Stephen J. Stein teaches Religious Studis at Indiana University.

Review quote

"Excellent .an essential tool for the study of ancient apocalyptic." Religious Studies Review, April 2001