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    Emotion, Restraint and Community in Ancient Rome (Classical Culture and Society) (Paperback) By (author) Robert A. Kaster

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    DescriptionEmotion, Restraint, and Community examines the ways in which emotions, and talk about emotions, interacted with the ethics of the Roman upper classes in the late Republic and early Empire. By considering how various Roman forms of fear, dismay, indignation, and revulsion created an economy of displeasure that shaped society in constructive ways, the book casts new light both on the Romans and on cross-cultural understanding of emotions.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Emotion, Restraint and Community in Ancient Rome

    Title
    Emotion, Restraint and Community in Ancient Rome
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Robert A. Kaster
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 264
    Width: 154 mm
    Height: 233 mm
    Thickness: 15 mm
    Weight: 375 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780195336078
    ISBN 10: 0195336070
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25540
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.1
    BIC subject category V2: HBTB
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD, HBLA, JM
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1QDAR
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    Libri: I-HP
    Ingram Theme: CULT/ITALY
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    BISAC V2.8: LAN009000
    B&T General Subject: 431
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/ANCIEN
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002020
    B&T Merchandise Category: POD
    DC22: 937
    LC classification: DG
    Abridged Dewey: 937
    BIC subject category V2: 1QDAR
    Thema V1.0: JM, NHTB, NHD, NHC
    Edition
    1
    Illustrations note
    black & white illustrations
    Publisher
    Oxford University Press Inc
    Imprint name
    Oxford University Press Inc
    Publication date
    08 November 2007
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Review quote
    "Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome is one of those scintillating books that tell us something about both the Romans and ourselves.... [Kaster is] a marvellous scholar at the top of his form."--Times Literary Supplement"This book is a splendid contribution to a field that has recently burgeoned: the study of the emotions in classical antiquity. Kaster investigates a complex of five interrelated Latin emotion terms: verecundia, pudor, paenitenita, invidia, and fastidium; to the chapters devoted to each of these, he appends an epilogue on integritas. The result is a rich portrait of what these ideas meant to the Romans and how they conditioned their behaviour.... Kaster is an excellent reader, and his elegant interpretations contribute greatly to the value of this gracefully written book."--David Konstan, Journal of Roman Studies"The importance of Kaster's new book cannot be overstated, both as a study of the Roman ideology of self-restraint in its own right and as a model of careful and intelligent scholarship that builds from ancient evidence. I eagerly awaited its publication...and I am not disappointed."--Susanna Braund, The Classical Review"A rich, stimulating investigation of a particular set of Roman emotions and of these emotions' interaction with ethics and behavior.... Kaster has been a leading voice in the 'history of emotions' movement."--Bryn Mawr Classical Review"Emotion, Restraint, and Community is a first-rate and timely book. It makes the clearest case that one is liable to encounter for the social (cognitive) basis of Roman emotions and makes, at the same time, a very strong argument for the continuity of these values throughout Roman pagan experience.... [A] deeply personal and very powerful book."--American Journal of Philology