Edda

Edda

Paperback Everyman S

By (author) Snorri Sturluson, Edited by Anthony Faulkes

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  • Publisher: Phoenix (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd )
  • Format: Paperback | 288 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 196mm x 25mm | 249g
  • Publication date: 23 January 2008
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0460876163
  • ISBN 13: 9780460876162
  • Edition: Annotated
  • Edition statement: Original ed.
  • Illustrations note: 32col.ill.
  • Sales rank: 58,132

Product description

Over a period of twenty years, Snorri Sturluson, scholar, courtier and poet, compiled the prose EDDA as a textbook for young poets who wished to praise kings. His work surveys the content, style and metres of traditional Viking poetry and includes a poem of Snorri's own, praising the king of Norway. Ironically, Snorri was killed in his own cellar in 1241 on the instigation of the king of Norway as a result of political intrigue. The EDDA contains the most extensive account of Norse myths and legends that has survived from the Middle Ages. This is the only edition available with introduction, text summaries, indexes and chronology of early Icelandic literature.

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Author information

Snorri Sturluson, historian, poet and politician, was born at Hvamm in western Iceland in 1179. He belonged to an aristocratic family, the Sturlungar. Snorri acquired great wealth and power and was twice lawspeaker at the Icelandic parliament, and twice visited Norway, where he became embroiled in the politics of King Hakon Hakonarson and the king's father-in-law, Earl Skuli. The latter rebelled against the king and was killed. Snorri also became subject to the king's displeasure and was killed in 1241 in his own cellar. His HEIMSKRINGLA is the best account of medieval Scandinavian history. He may also be the author of EGILS SAGA, one of the finest of the Sagas of Icelanders.