• The Ecological Thought See large image

    The Ecological Thought (Paperback) By (author) Timothy Morton

    $18.75 - Save $5.39 22% off - RRP $24.14 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionIn this passionate, lucid, and surprising book, Timothy Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh. This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life. No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does "Nature" exist as an entity separate from the uglier or more synthetic elements of life. Realizing this interconnectedness is what Morton calls the ecological thought. In three concise chapters, Morton investigates the profound philosophical, political, and aesthetic implications of the fact that all life forms are interconnected. As a work of environmental philosophy and theory, "The Ecological Thought" explores an emerging awareness of ecological reality in an age of global warming. Using Darwin and contemporary discoveries in life sciences as root texts, Morton describes a mesh of deeply interconnected life forms - intimate, strange, and lacking fixed identity. A "prequel" to his "Ecology without Nature: Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics" (Harvard, 2007), "The Ecological Thought" is an engaged and accessible work that will challenge the thinking of readers in disciplines ranging from critical theory to Romanticism to cultural geography.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for The Ecological Thought

    Title
    The Ecological Thought
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Timothy Morton
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 184
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 229 mm
    Thickness: 15 mm
    Weight: 272 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780674064225
    ISBN 10: 0674064224
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: ENV
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    B&T General Subject: 560
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S8.3
    BIC subject category V2: RNA
    Ingram Theme: TOPC/ECOLGY
    BISAC V2.8: SCI026000
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 17610
    BISAC V2.8: PHI013000
    B&T Approval Code: A60400000, A50090000
    Ingram Subject Code: EV
    LC classification: GE
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: NAT011000, PHI010000
    Abridged Dewey: 333
    BISAC V2.8: PHI026000, SCI020000
    DC22: 577.01
    DC23: 577.01
    Thema V1.0: QDTJ, TQ, RNK, PSAF, RNA
    Edition statement
    Reprint
    Publisher
    HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint name
    HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Publication date
    03 April 2012
    Publication City/Country
    Cambridge, Mass
    Author Information
    Timothy Morton is Rita Shea Guffey Chair of English at Rice University.
    Review quote
    Timothy Morton has a unique take on ecology that challenges much of the alternative consciousness that floats around on the periphery of environmental circles. He offers a profound take on human possibilities. To Morton, human society and Nature are not two distinct things but rather two different angles on the same thing. Tikkun 20110629 By suggesting imaginative ways to resolve other crises, could humanities scholars stave off the crisis engulfing their own subjects? Morton proposes a future in which the venerable ideas of "nature" and "environment" are so much detritus, useless for addressing a looming ecological catastrophe. His book exemplifies the "serious" humanities scholarship he makes a plea for. My head's still spinning. -- Noel Castree Times Higher Education 20110908 Morton's The Ecological Thought rejects the romantic concept of nature as a passive foil to human action. The natural world, as it turns out, is not something outside of us; or, put another way: there is no difference between humans and our environment...He asks us to engage in "radical openness" as a way of practicing "radical coexistence," a state of being that we live even when we do not think much about it...Morton's book allows us to see our stirrings of sympathy for nonhuman beings such as strawberries as the beginning of a recognition that we have all--people and plants alike--lost long ago our presumed roots in an imagined natural world. -- Natania Meeker and Antonia Szabari Los Angeles Review of Books 20120509