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    Eating and Drinking in Roman Britain (Hardback) By (author) H.E.M. Cool

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    DescriptionWhat were the eating and drinking habits of the inhabitants of Britain during the Roman period? Drawing on evidence from a large number of archaeological excavations, this fascinating 2006 study shows how varied these habits were in different regions and amongst different communities and challenges the idea that there was any one single way of being Roman or native. Integrating a range of archaeological sources, including pottery, metalwork and environmental evidence such as animal bone and seeds, this book illuminates eating and drinking choices, providing invaluable insights into how those communities regarded their world. The book contains sections on the nature of the different types of evidence used and how this can be analysed. It will be a useful guide to all archaeologists and those who wish to learn about the strength and weaknesses of this material and how best to use it.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Eating and Drinking in Roman Britain

    Title
    Eating and Drinking in Roman Britain
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) H.E.M. Cool
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 304
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 228 mm
    Thickness: 22 mm
    Weight: 610 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780521802765
    ISBN 10: 0521802768
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.5
    BIC E4L: HIS
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 04
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14540
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    Ingram Subject Code: AH
    Libri: I-AH
    BIC subject category V2: HDDK
    B&T General Subject: 431
    BISAC V2.8: SOC003000
    DC22: 641.5941
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002020
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 02
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    LC subject heading: , , ,
    LC classification: TX717 .C6644 2007
    BISAC V2.8: CKB011000
    Thema V1.0: NKD
    Edition statement
    New.
    Illustrations note
    30 b/w illus. 43 tables
    Publisher
    CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint name
    CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Publication date
    29 January 2007
    Publication City/Country
    Cambridge
    Author Information
    Hilary Cool is a professional archaeologist who, for the past ten years, has run her own business providing post excavation services to the professional sector.
    Review quote
    'With considerations of Romanisation and identity very much at the forefront of current thinking and research ion roman archaeology, it is a pleasure to welcome a book which makes such a substantive contribution to the subject ... this is a very original book, essential reading for all working and researching in the filed of roman archaeology.' British Archaeology '... elegant, readable ...' Cambridge Archaeological Journal "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.' [Cool] begins her fascinating study of eating and drinking in Roman Britain with this quotation from Brillat-Savarin. By the end of the book, the reader has been provided with a mass of detailed archaeological evidence, laid out with admirable clarity, from which to make an informed attempt to judge for themselves 'who the Roman Britons were'.' The Journal of Classics Teaching 'Like the author, most of us are interested in food and drink, so this book should have wide appeal, and deservedly so. ... The evidence available to her is peculiarly rich, extending beyond the confines of artefacts and environmental evidence to the treasure house of the Vindolanda tablets, and her masterly collation and interpretation of this evidence will be of interest to specialist and non-specialist alike.' Britannia
    Table of contents
    1. Aperitif; 2. The food itself; 3. The packaging; 4. The human remains; 5. Written evidence; 6. Kitchen and dining basics: techniques and utensils; 7. The store cupboard; 8. Staples; 9. Meat; 10. Dairy products; 11. Poultry and eggs; 12. Fish and seafood; 13. Game; 14. Greengrocery; 15. Drink; 16. The end of independence; 17. A brand new province; 18. Coming of age; 19. A different world; 20. Digestif.