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    Early Soviet Jet Fighters (Hardback) By (author) Gordon Yefim, By (author) Dmitriy Komissarov

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    DescriptionBy the end of the Second World War the USA and Great Britain had developed viable jet fighters, even if these aircraft came a bit too late to have a significant impact on the course of the conflict. Germany achieved greater success, using the Me 262 and He 162 jet fighters operationally in the closing stages of the war. In contrast, the Soviet Union lagged behind, even though research on turbojet engines had begun in the USSR in the late 1930s. This deficiency was recognized and at the end of the war, captured German jet aircraft and engines enabled the USSR to reverse‐engineer the technology. Even so, the USSR struggled to catch up until in 1946, the British Labor government gifted the Soviets the latest in propulsion technology, the Rolls‐Royce Nene and Derwent V engines. This inexplicable action allowed a much more capable generation of Soviet jet fighters to be born and by the end of the 1940s Soviet industry had caught up with, and in some respects surpassed the West, in jet aviation. Because of the Stalinist era in which the first Soviet jets were developed, up until now little has been known about the early post‐war designs from the design bureaus of Mikoyan, Yakovlev, Lavochkin, Sukhoi and Alekseyev and the background to even relatively well‐known types such as the MiG‐9, La‐9 and YAK‐15 is barely documented. Other early jet types, proposals and projects were virtually unknown in the West. This gap is now redressed by the famous Soviet aviation historian Yefim Gordon and in his latest work he draws on extensive research in design bureau files, official documents and military archives, many of which have only very recently become available, having been labelled 'Top Secret' for decades. This volume presents, in considerable detail, the development, history and technical specifications of the earliest Soviet jet fighters and the extensive illustrations-around 750 photos, over 50 specially‐commissioned color drawings and a host of line drawings ‐ are mostly from previously classified sources the majority of which are previously unseen. This book is certain to be essential reading for aviation historians, enthusiasts and modelers.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Early Soviet Jet Fighters

    Title
    Early Soviet Jet Fighters
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Gordon Yefim, By (author) Dmitriy Komissarov
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 432
    Width: 213 mm
    Height: 300 mm
    Thickness: 46 mm
    Weight: 2,018 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781902109350
    ISBN 10: 190210935X
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T12.6
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    BIC E4L: TRA
    BIC subject category V2: WGM
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DVU
    B&T General Subject: 520
    BISAC V2.8: HIS027140
    Ingram Subject Code: HM
    Libri: I-HM
    Abridged Dewey: 355
    Ingram Theme: CULT/EEUROP
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET180
    Ingram Theme: CULT/RUSSIA
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14370
    BISAC V2.8: HIS012000
    LC classification: UG
    BIC subject category V2: 1DVU
    DC23: 623.74640947
    Thema V1.0: JWCM, NHD, WGM
    Thema geographical qualifier V1.0: 1QBDR
    Illustrations note
    over 750 photos and illustrations
    Publisher
    Hikoki Publications
    Imprint name
    Hikoki Publications
    Publication date
    03 June 2014
    Publication City/Country
    Ottringham
    Review quote
    ..". a must have book for the Soviet jet enthusiast or anyone interested in the early days of jet propulsion. Most highly recommended."--Scott Van Aken"Modeling Madness" (07/08/2014)
    Flap copy
    By the end of the Second World War the USA and Great Britain had developed viable jet fighters, even if these aircraft came a bit too late to have a significant impact on the course of the conflict. Germany achieved greater success, using the Me 262 and He 162 jet fighters operationally in the closing stages of the war. In contrast, the Soviet Union lagged behind, even though research on turbojet engines had begun in the USSR in the late 1930s. This deficiency was recognized and at the end of the war, captured German jet aircraft and engines enabled the USSR to reverse engineer the technology. Even so, the USSR struggled to catch up until in 1946, the British Labor government gifted the Soviets the latest in propulsion technology, the Rolls Royce Nene and Derwent V engines. This inexplicable action allowed a much more capable generation of Soviet jet fighters to be born and by the end of the 1940s Soviet industry had caught up with, and in some respects surpassed the West, in jet aviation. Because of the Stalinist era in which the first Soviet jets were developed, up until now little has been known about the early post war designs from the design bureaus of Mikoyan, Yakovlev, Lavochkin, Sukhoi and Alekseyev and the background to even relatively well known types such as the MiG 9, La 9 and YAK 15 is barely documented. Other early jet types, proposals and projects were virtually unknown in the West. This gap is now redressed by the famous Soviet aviation historian Yefim Gordon and in his latest work he draws on extensive research in design bureau files, official documents and military archives, many of which have only very recently become available, having been labelled 'Top Secret' for decades.