Early Modern Europe

Early Modern Europe : A Critical Reader

Edited by James B. Collins , Edited by Karen Taylor

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This reader brings together original and influential recent work in the field of early modern European history. * Provides a thought-provoking overview of current thinking on this period. * Key themes include evolving early-modern identities; changes in religion and cultural life; the revolution of the mind; roles of women in early-modern societies; the rise of the modern state; and Europe and the new world system * Incorporates new scholarship on Eastern and Central Europe. * Includes an article translated into English for the first time.

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  • Paperback | 480 pages
  • 172 x 242 x 32mm | 861.84g
  • 07 Oct 2005
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
  • BLACKWELL PUBLISHERS
  • Oxford
  • English
  • Revised.
  • 1
  • 0631228934
  • 9780631228936
  • 1,380,606

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Author Information

James B. Collins is Professor of History at Georgetown University, and Chair of the History Department. Karen L. Taylor is Lecturer in History at Georgetown University.

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Review quote

"Collin and Taylor's anthology... will be a valuable resource in teaching the historiography of the early modern era." History "Touches on a wide range of methodologies ... .Offers ... a broadening of horizons beyond any specialty. Much undiscovered territory ... much inspiration." Sixteenth Century Journal

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Back cover copy

This collection brings together original and influential recent work in the field of early modern European history. It provides a thought-provoking overview of current thinking on this period, demonstrating that history is a dynamic process of interpretation. The book is structured around six major themes: evolving early modern identities, treated within a global context; changes in religion and cultural life; the revolution of the mind; roles of women in early modern societies; the rise of the modern state; and research paradigms. Each of the six sections contains an introduction by the editors, discussing the significance of the topic and the history of its interpretation; five or six essays are then followed by a 'debate' juxtaposing two competing interpretations on a particular theme. Noteworthy features of the collection include an article translated into English for the first time and the incorporation of new scholarship on eastern and central Europe.

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