Each Peach Pear Plum

Each Peach Pear Plum

By (author) Allan Ahlberg , By (author) Janet Ahlberg

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\'In this book with your little eye, take a look and play \'I spy\' - so starts the classic story from best-selling author/illustrator team Janet and Allan Ahlberg. A poem on each spread gives the clue as to what is hiding in the picture opposite. Many well-known nursery characters are included so that young children can follow the rhymes and enjoy the story.

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  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 193 x 246 x 3mm
  • 13 Mar 1989
  • Penguin Books Ltd
  • Puffin Books
  • English
  • colour illustrations
  • 0140509194
  • 9780140509199
  • 12,702

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Author Information

Janet and Allan Ahlberg created some of the world's most popular picture books, including EACH PEACH PEAR PLUM and THE JOLLY CHRISTMAS POSTMAN, both winners of Greenaway Medals, and THE BABY'S CATALOGUE, inspired by their daughter Jessica. Janet died in 1994 and Allan, a former teacher, now lives in London.

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Review text

The Ahlberg penchant for playing with nursery characters (Jeremiah in the Dark Woods, 1978) has issue this time in a more traditional, pastoral-pretty nursery book. "Each Peach Pear Plum/ I spy Tom Thumb," reads the first couplet (of what was originally a counting-out rhyme), while opposite Tom sits half-hidden in a tree; "Tom Thumb in the cupboard/ I spy Mother Hubbard" shows him in plain sight and - look sharp! - only her posterior, looming in the picture's corner. And so it goes, with a new character named - and cleverly half-concealed - at each of the openings. Youngsters will enjoy spying them out and appreciate their comical faces until at the finale - "Plum Pie in the sun/ I spy. . . EVERYONE!" - they all spring out from concealment and sit down to a picnic feast. Once you've seen it, true, there are no surprises but, for the very young, there's another sort of satisfaction from knowing what's coming next. (Kirkus Reviews)

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