• Dust: (Wool Trilogy 3) See large image

    Dust: (Wool Trilogy 3) (Arrow Books) (Paperback) By (author) Hugh Howey

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    DescriptionThis is the much-anticipated final instalment of the Wool trilogy. "The next Hunger Games". (The Sunday Times). "Thrilling, thought-provoking and memorable ...one of dystopian fiction's masterpieces alongside the likes of 1984 and Brave New World". (Daily Express). In the aftermath of the uprising, the people of Silo 18 are coming to terms with a new order. Some embrace the change, others fear the unknown; none have control of their fate. The Silo is still in danger. There are those set on its destruction. Jules knows they must be stopped. The battle has been won. The war is just beginning.


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    another excellent read5

    Marianne Vincent Dust is the third and final volume of the Silo series by American author, Hugh Howey. Three narrative strands describe events in each of Silos 18, 17 and 1, starting just after Juliette Nichols is elected Mayor of Silo 18. Juliette's priorities, far from her Mayoral duties, include tunnelling to Silo 17 and going Outside again for some investigative work, both of which provoke nervousness and fear in the Silo, rather than the hope they had experienced on her return, leading many to turn to the congregation of Father Wendel and his Acolyte Emmy; IT boss Lukas is in daily radio contact with Donald in Silo 1, trying to discover more about the world before; Jimmy Parker and the kids await Jules' promised return to Silo 17 with mixed emotions; Donald, still posing as Thurman, tries to find a way to help Silo 18 in an attempt to atone for his role in the Silo scheme, while his sister, Charlotte is busy modifying drones to seek out an uncontaminated place. Just when the reader believes all the shocking measures instituted by the architects of the Silo scheme are known (the Cleaning with its the deliberately faulty suits, the Population Control, the destruction of Silos in revolt, the isolation from other Silos), Jules uncovers yet another indicator of their ruthlessness that will leave the reader gasping. Once again, Howey gives the reader an interesting plot with several twists, plenty of suspense and an exciting climax (or two or three). His characters are complex and compelling and their assessment of their situation is often relevant in the greater world. Donald muses that "Mankind had the right to go extinct. That's what life did: it went extinct. It made room for the next in line. But individual men had often railed against the natural order" and he is told by Thurman "...the most difficult task mankind ever tried to master - and that we never quite managed - was how to pass supreme power from one hand to the next". Donald finally tells Charlotte "Maybe the kinds of people who try to shape the world feel like they're smarter than chaos itself". This gripping page-turner may be the last of the series, but readers would very likely welcome a further update on the world Howey has created. Another excellent read. by Marianne Vincent

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