Do No Harm
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Do No Harm : How Aid Can Support Peace - or War

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Description

Echoing the words of the Hippocratic Oath, the author challenges aid agency staff to take responsibility for the ways that their assistance affects conflicts. Mary B. Anderson cites the experiences of many aid providers in war-torn societies to show that international assistance - even when it is effective in saving lives, alleviating suffering and furthering sustainable development - too often reinforces divisions among contending groups. But more importantly, she offers hopeful evidence of creative programmes that point the way to new approaches to aid. Calling for a redesign of assistance programmes so that they do not harm while doing their intended good, she argues futher that many opportunities exist for aid workers to in fact support the processes by which societies disengage from war.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 152 x 226 x 12mm | 258.55g
  • Lynne Rienner Publishers Inc
  • Boulder, CO, United States
  • English
  • 1555878342
  • 9781555878344
  • 122,235

Table of contents

Part 1 War and the Impact of Extenal Aid: Today's Wars and the Pursuit of Justice; The Characteristics of Conflict Areas; Aid's Impact on Conflict Through Resource Transfers; Aid's Impact on Conflict Through Implicict Ethical Messages; Framework for Analyzing Aid's Impact on Conflict. Part 2 Capacities for Peace - Case Studies: Food for Work Rebuilding Homes in Khatlon Province, Tajikistan; Sawa/Education for Peace - Uniting Lebanon's Children and Youth During War; Constructing Peace - A Case Study of Guatemala 1976 - 1996; Reconciliation within the Red Cross; International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies in Bosnia and Herzegovina; Two Programs in Somalia - Lower Shabelle and Gedo; From Support of War to Support of Peace - NGOs Operating on Pakistan and Afghanistan. Conclusion: Lessons from the Field.

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