• Diplomacy by Design: Luxury Arts and an "International Style" in the Ancient Near East, 1400-1200 BCE See large image

    Diplomacy by Design: Luxury Arts and an "International Style" in the Ancient Near East, 1400-1200 BCE (Hardback) By (author) Marian H. Feldman

    $79.00 - Save $4.95 (5%) - RRP $83.95 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 4 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionArt and international relations during the Late Bronze Age formed a symbiosis as expanded travel and written communications fostered unprecedented cultural exchange across the Mediterranean. Diplomacy in these new political and imperial relationships was often maintained through the exchange of lavish art objects and luxury goods. The items bestowed during this time shared a repertoire of imagery that modern scholars call the first International Style in the history of art. Marian H. Feldman's "Diplomacy by Design" examines the profound connection between art produced during this period and its social context, revealing inanimate objects as catalysts - or even participants - in human dynamics. Feldman's fascinating study shows the ways in which the exchange of these works of art actively mediated and strengthened political relations, intercultural interactions, and economic negotiations. Previous studies of this international style have focused almost exclusively on stylistic attribution at the expense of social contextualization. Written by a specialist in ancient near Eastern art and archaeology who has excavated and traveled extensively in this area of the world, "Diplomacy by Design" provides a much broader consideration of the symbolic power of material culture and its centrality in the construction of human relations.


Other books

Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 11 of 11

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for Diplomacy by Design

    Title
    Diplomacy by Design
    Subtitle
    Luxury Arts and an "International Style" in the Ancient Near East, 1400-1200 BCE
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Marian H. Feldman
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 272
    Width: 224 mm
    Height: 285 mm
    Thickness: 25 mm
    Weight: 1,383 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780226240442
    ISBN 10: 0226240444
    Classifications

    B&T General Subject: 140
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.5
    BIC E4L: HIS
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BIC subject category V2: HDD
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/ANCIEN
    Ingram Subject Code: AT
    Libri: I-AT
    BIC subject category V2: AFT
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: HIS026000
    B&T Approval Code: A15300000
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15530
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 27
    BISAC V2.8: ART015060
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 745.09394
    LC subject heading: ,
    B&T Approval Code: A02301500, A02302000
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC22: 745/.0939/4
    LC classification: N5330 .F45 2006
    Thema V1.0: AFT, NKD
    Illustrations note
    20 colour plates, 71 halftones, 2 maps, 1 table
    Publisher
    The University of Chicago Press
    Imprint name
    University of Chicago Press
    Publication date
    15 September 2006
    Publication City/Country
    Chicago, IL
    Author Information
    Marian H. Feldman is assistant professor of ancient Near Eastern art in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.
    Review quote
    "This is a superb piece of scholarship, as well crafted as the objects it describes in fluent and knowledgeable detail. Diplomacy by Design is a strikingly original, lucid volume bound to entice a diverse readership." - A. Bernard Knapp, University of Glasgow"
    Flap copy
    During the fourteenth and thirteenth centuries BCE, the kings of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, and Hatti participated in a complex international community. These two hundred years also witnessed the production of luxurious artworks made of gold, ivory, alabaster, and faience--objects that helped to foster good relations among the kingdoms. In fact, as Marian H. Feldman makes clear here, art and international relations during the Late Bronze Age formed an unprecedented symbiosis, in concert with expanded travel and written communications across the Mediterranean. And thus diplomacy was invigorated through the exchange of lavish art objects and luxury goods, which shared a repertoire of imagery that modern scholars have called the first International Style in the history of art. Previous studies have focused almost exclusively on stylistic attribution of these objects at the expense of social contextualization. Feldman's "Diplomacy by Design" instead examines the profound connection between art produced during this period and its social and political contexts, revealing inanimate objects as catalysts--or even participants--in human dynamics. Feldman's fascinating study shows the ways in which the diplomatic circulation of these works actively mediated and strengthened political relations, intercultural interactions, and economic negotiations and she does so through diverse disciplinary frameworks including art history, anthropology, and social history. Written by a specialist in ancient Near Eastern art and archaeology who has excavated and traveled extensively in this area of the world, "Diplomacy by Design" considers anew the symbolic power of material culture and its centrality in the construction of human relations.