Developing Nations and the Politics of Global Integration

Developing Nations and the Politics of Global Integration

Paperback Integrating National Economies: Promise & Pitfalls

By (author) Stephan Haggard

$18.65
List price $19.53
You save $0.88 (4%)

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 4 business days
When will my order arrive?

Additional formats available

Format
Hardback $46.58
  • Publisher: BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
  • Format: Paperback | 210 pages
  • Dimensions: 154mm x 230mm x 15mm | 281g
  • Publication date: 1 April 1995
  • Publication City/Country: Washington DC
  • ISBN 10: 0815733895
  • ISBN 13: 9780815733898
  • Edition statement: New.
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations

Product description

This work is part of the Integrating National Economies series. As global markets for goods, services and financial assets have become increasingly integrated, national governments no longer have as much control over economic markets. With the completion of the Uruguay Round of the GATT talks, the world economy has entered a fresh phase requiring different rules and different levels of international cooperation. Policies once thought to be entirely domestic and appropriately determined by national political institutions, are now subject to international constraints. Cogent analysis of this deeper integration of the world economy, and guidelines for government policies, are urgent priorities. This series aims to meet these needs over a range of 21 books by some of the world's leading economists, political scientists, foreign policy specialists and government officials. All the books in the series are offered at the same price: #22.50 for hardbacks and #8.50 for paperbacks.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Back cover copy

Haggard examines developing-country responses to growing global economic integration. He pays close attention to the impact on developing-country policy of international events and pressures, on one hand, and domestic conditions, on the other.