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    Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries (Hardback) By (author) Neil Degrasse Tyson

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    DescriptionReaders of his essays in "Natural History" magazine recognise Neil deGrasse Tyson's talent for guiding them through the mysteries of the cosmos with clarity and enthusiasm. Here, Tyson compiles his favourite essays across a myriad of topics. The title essay introduces readers to the physics of black holes by explaining the gory details of what would happen to your body if you fell into one. "Holy Wars" examines the needless friction between science and religion in the context of historical conflicts. And "Hollywood Nights" assails the movie industry's feeble efforts to get its night skies right.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Death by Black Hole

    Title
    Death by Black Hole
    Subtitle
    And Other Cosmic Quandaries
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Neil Degrasse Tyson
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 320
    Width: 150 mm
    Height: 208 mm
    Thickness: 36 mm
    Weight: 522 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780393062243
    ISBN 10: 0393062244
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: SCI
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S7.0
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    BIC subject category V2: PGM
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 94
    Ingram Subject Code: SE
    Libri: I-SE
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Merchandise Category: SCI
    B&T General Subject: 710
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 16480
    B&T Approval Code: A52550000
    B&T Modifier: Continuations: 10
    LC subject heading: ,
    B&T Approval Code: A52010000, A50890000
    BISAC V2.8: SCI004000, SCI015000, SCI080000
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 523.8/875, 523.8875
    LC classification: QB982 .T965 2007
    LC subject heading:
    Thema V1.0: PD, PGK
    Publisher
    WW Norton & Co
    Imprint name
    WW Norton & Co
    Publication date
    13 February 2007
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON is an astrophysicist with the American Museum of Natural History and serves as the director of the Hayden Planetarium. He is the author of Origins, which was praised as "very good popular science" in The Times.
    Review quote
    "...even more worthwhile for its sense of adventure and for showing just what science - imagination constrained by evidence - can tell us." Martin Ince, The Times Higher Education Supplement "...the excitement glows from every page." New Scientist"
    Review text
    A collection of the author's astronomy columns from Natural History.Astrophysicist Tyson (Origins, 2004, etc.), director of the American Museum of Natural History's Hayden Planetarium, groups his essays into several broad categories. The first, "The Nature of Knowledge," includes pieces on how science has grown because of extensions to our senses via instruments that collect data none of us could otherwise obtain; one essay shows what can be learned by measuring and making calculations from a stick poked into the ground. "The Knowledge of Nature" looks at basic astronomical facts: the planets, the asteroids, the points where gravity holds an object in orbit. "Ways and Means of Nature" discusses natural constants such as the speed of light and the surprisingly complicated question, "What color are the objects around the universe?" (Many published astronomical photographs show colors that correspond not to what an observer in space might see, but to phenomena the astronomer wishes to display graphically, such as the relative temperature of the objects portrayed.) "The Meaning of Life" addresses various conditions that seem to be necessary for life to evolve in a planetary system, including the "Goldilocks" question of the right temperature to allow liquid water on a planet's surface. "When the Universe Turns Bad" discusses cosmic disasters, notably the earth's being incinerated as the sun becomes (in several billion years) a red giant. "Science and Culture" looks at the sometimes uncomprehending reaction of the public to theories and discoveries; in Tyson's opinion, a wider knowledge of simple math might solve many of the most bizarre responses. Finally, "Science and God" touches on those areas where science and religion appear to compete for the same turf: notably, the origin of the universe, and whether it betrays evidence of design.Smoothly entertaining, full of fascinating tidbits and frequently humorous, these essays show Tyson as one of today's best popularizers of science. (Kirkus Reviews)