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Culture Through Objects: Ancient Near Eastern Studies in Honour of P.R.S.Moorey

Culture Through Objects: Ancient Near Eastern Studies in Honour of P.R.S.Moorey

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Edited by Timothy F. Potts, Edited by Michael Roaf, Edited by Diana Stein

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  • Publisher: Griffith Institute
  • Format: Paperback | 424 pages
  • Dimensions: 170mm x 242mm x 30mm | 1,152g
  • Publication date: 10 July 2003
  • Publication City/Country: Oxford
  • ISBN 10: 0900416793
  • ISBN 13: 9780900416798
  • Edition statement: New.
  • Illustrations note: 74 b/w figs, 2 col illus

Product description

Published in honour of P. R. S. Moorey, one of the foremost Near Eastern scholars of his generation, this book brings together nineteen studies by leading international specialists on the archaeology of the ancient Near East. The volume focuses on three main themes that have been central to Moorey's extensive contributions to the field: tracking cultural transfers, understanding images, and the study of ancient materials and manufacture. Ranging widely in time and space from Egypt to Central Asia and from the Neolithic to the Sasanian period, the studies are linked by their shared methodology, namely a commitment to the crucial role played by objects in the reconstruction of past cultures and the recognition of the importance of contextual analysis in evaluating the material evidence. The papers present the results of current research on a variety of topics including the origins of pharaonic iconography, the spread of writing, stone vessels, prehistoric figurines, the iconography of seals, early metallurgy, ancient cuisine and the use of works of art in ancient societies.

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Author information

edited by Timothy Potts, Michael Roaf and Diana Stein

Review quote

Many of the contributions in this book ... reflect this integration of first-rate scholarship and desire to push back the parameters of interpretation, '--Sean Kingsley"Minerva" (01/01/0001)

Table of contents

P. R. S. Moorey: Bibliography 1964-2002. I. Tracking Cultural Transfers. Introduction (T F Potts); Early definitions of the Egyptian world and its surroundings (C C Lamberg-Karlovsky); A soft-stone genre from southeastern Iran: 'zig-zag' bowls from Magan to Margiana (D T Potts); The north-south divide in ancient Jordan: ceramics, regionalism and routes (P Bienkowski); Von Bissing's Memphis Stela: a product of cultural transfer? (O W Muscarella); Disguise and exchange in eastern imagery (J Boardman). II. Understanding Images. Introduction (D L Stein); Interpreting animal art in the prehistoric Near East (D Wengrow); Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold (E McAdam); Scorpion, fish and nets: an unusual jar in Canaanite Middle Bronze context (M Tadmor); Symbol's of conquest in Sennacherib's reliefs of Lachish: impaled prisoners and booty (D Ussishkin); The gold plaques of the Oxus Treasure: manufacture, decoration and meaning (J Curtis and A Searight); Hero and worshipper at Seleucia: re-inventions of Babylonia on a banded agate cylinder seal of the Achaemenid Empire (M Cool Root). III. Materials and Manufacture. Introduction (M D Roaf); Chalcolithic copper-based metallurgy on the Iranian plateau: a new look at old evidence from Tal-I-Iblis (V C Pigott and H Lechtman); Early Bronze Age I copper production on the coast of Israel: archaeometallurgical analysis of finds from Ashkelon-Afridar (S Shalev); Le temple d'Inshushinak en Suse et l'architecture monumentale en 'faience' (A Caubet); Vitreous materials in Ugarit: new data (V Matonan and A Bouquillon); From Mesopotamia to Merv: reconstructing patterns of consumption in Sasanian households (St J Simpson); Who used ivories in the first millennium BC? (G Hermann and A Millard); 'Surpassing work': mastery of materials and the value of skilled production in ancient Sumer (I J Winter).