The Cult of Divine Birth in Ancient Greece
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The Cult of Divine Birth in Ancient Greece

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Description

This book argues that specialized cadres of virgin priestesses in ancient Greece were believed to give birth in miraculous fashion as a means of bringing forth holy political and spiritual leaders.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 289 pages
  • 139.7 x 213.36 x 20.32mm | 385.55g
  • Palgrave MacMillan
  • Basingstoke, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Reprint
  • biography
  • 0230111327
  • 9780230111325
  • 1,016,327

Review quote

'This book is bold, creative, and courageous, and makes a considerable contribution to feminist re-readings and reinterpretations of religious and mythological traditions from the Graeco-Roman world.' - Marvin Meyer, Griset Professor of Bible and Christian Studies, Chapman University; author of The Gospel of Judas, The Gospels of Mary, The Gnostic Bible, and Ancient Christian Magic 'Thought provoking and superbly written, this is the only book to examine thoroughly and seriously the question of divine birth in ancient Greece. Imperative for classical scholars, the book provides stunning insights that should be a fascinating read for anyone who has even the slightest interest in spirituality, religion, feminism, or ancient history.'- Jorge N. Ferrer, coeditor of The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies 'Her insightful study of the priestesshoods of divine birth brings the subject into focus and suggests new scholarly perspectives.' - Charlene Spretnak, author of Lost Goddesses of Early Greece 'Rigoglioso argues that the divine birth priestesses engaged in mystical practices intended to allow them to give birth parthenogenetically (without a man). The evidence she brings together in support of this idea is impressive. I recommend this book highly to anyone interested in the roles of women in ancient Greek religion.' - Carol P. Christ 'We can accept...that it is really "the first scholarly book to explore the theme of divine birth in ancient Greece in an in-depth and comprehensive fashion" and value its contribution to women studies and value its contribution to women studies and interpretation of Ancient Mythology generally.' -Ostrava Journal of English Philologyshow more

About Marguerite Rigoglioso

MARGUERITE RIGOGLIOSO is an adjunct instructor at the Dominican University of California, USA.show more

Table of contents

A Taxonomy of Divine Birth Priestesshoods Divinity, Birth, and Virginity: The Greek Worldview Athena's Divine Birth Priestesshood Artemis's Divine Birth Priestesshood Hera's Divine Birth Priestesshood The Divine Birth Priestesshood at Dodona The Divine Birth Priestesshood at Delphi Is Virgin Birth Possible? and Other Outrageous Questionsshow more

Review Text

'This book is bold, creative, and courageous, and makes a considerable contribution to feminist re-readings and reinterpretations of religious and mythological traditions from the Graeco-Roman world.' - Marvin Meyer, Griset Professor of Bible and Christian Studies, Chapman University; author of The Gospel of Judas, The Gospels of Mary, The Gnostic Bible, and Ancient Christian Magic 'Thought provoking and superbly written, this is the only book to examine thoroughly and seriously the question of divine birth in ancient Greece. Imperative for classical scholars, the book provides stunning insights that should be a fascinating read for anyone who has even the slightest interest in spirituality, religion, feminism, or ancient history.'- Jorge N. Ferrer, coeditor of The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies 'Her insightful study of the priestesshoods of divine birth brings the subject into focus and suggests new scholarly perspectives.' - Charlene Spretnak, author of Lost Goddesses of Early Greece 'Rigoglioso argues that the divine birth priestesses engaged in mystical practices intended to allow them to give birth parthenogenetically (without a man). The evidence she brings together in support of this idea is impressive. I recommend this book highly to anyone interested in the roles of women in ancient Greek religion.' - Carol P. Christ 'We can accept...that it is really "the first scholarly book to explore the theme of divine birth in ancient Greece in an in-depth and comprehensive fashion" and value its contribution to women studies and value its contribution to women studies and interpretation of Ancient Mythology generally.' -Ostrava Journal of English Philologyshow more