Crossed: Badlands v. 5

Crossed: Badlands v. 5 : Badlands

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Journey back to the earliest days of the Crossed outbreak, when an outbreak of viral insanity first plunged an unsuspecting world into darkness, in two tales scribed by the masters of modern horror, David Lapham and David Hine! In high school, Edmund earned his nickname Yellow Belly by running away and hiding whenever confronted by conflicts or fears. But when the Crossed infection ignites at a local circus, when a world of color and delight turns to anguish and misery, perhaps it s that very same cowardice that will save him in the end! Meanwhile, a group of self-centered and hedonistic college kids head to a writer's retreat to explore their inner selves... but end up surrounded by berserk killers. What depths will they sink to in order to survive the grinning, gruesome hordes hunting them through the wilderness?"show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 168 x 258 x 40mm | 499.99g
  • Avatar Press
  • United States
  • English
  • chiefly col. Illustrations
  • 1592911854
  • 9781592911851
  • 150,122

About David Hine

Beginning his career in comic books as a freelance artist in 1990, David Lapham founded El Capitan Books in 1995 exclusively to publish his Eisner Award-winning crime comic book series, Stray Bullets. In recent years, he has worked as a writer for DC Comics, Marvel Comics, IDW Publishing, Dark Horse, and finally Avatar Press, on three Crossed projects (Family Values, Crossed 3D, and Psychopath), Ferals, and Caligula. David Hine is an English writer and illustrator of comic books, contributing memorable stories to some of the most recognizable intellectual properties in comics today. His prior comics work includes such titles as Judge Dredd, Daredevil, Spawn, X-Men, Inhumans: Silent War, Batman: The Joker's Asylum, Spider-Man, The Darkness, and Detective Comics. In 2012, Hine contributed tales to two of the most popular lines from Avatar Press, Crossed and Night of the Living Dead. Jacen Burrows is truly one of the rising stars in comic book illustration. Working exclusively with Avatar Press through the years, his skillful talents have brought to life the visions of such comic book luminaries as Alan Moore (Neonomicon) and Warren Ellis (Scars). After early collaborations with Garth Ennis on 303, a war story set in Afghanistan, and Chronicles Of Wormwood, a tale of a reluctant, butt-kicking Anti-Christ, he tackled Crossed, defining the look of its bleak world and laying the groundwork for the most successful horror franchise in more

Review quote

"If you can stomach it, you should be reading Crossed right now." ("show more

Customer reviews

David Lapham hasn’t has much luck with his Crossed stories, but Garth Ennis is a tough act to follow. This story is actually one of the better ones and certainly his best Crossed work so far. It has a very relatable and sympathetic character, who definitely doesn’t have the skills needed to survive, but through good characterisation you keep rooting for him. There are a couple of clunky names of people and places that are quite intrusive but mostly this ticks along just fine. The Crossed are the Crossed and while there is occasionally a new depravity they rarely shine. We do meet a character from another book for the first time ever and it will make you smile if you have been following the whole series. The ending has quite a lacklustre twist but if you look carefully all may not be as it seems. Art is by series stalwart Jacen Burrows who is really in his element drawing clear faces, plenty of detail, and using great angles to show the action. The next story is by David Hine and is quite a cerebral work. One of the tools of fiction is to act as a mirror for the human condition and Hine lays it on thick here raising very profound questions. He references quite a few literary works and the comparison between Crossed and Edgar Alan Poe’s Masque of the Red Death is definitely intriguing. The Crossed are almost an afterthought here yet do have a role to play. A secondary storyline fades in comparison to the main one leaving you wondering if this was a pitch Hine had before being invited into the Crossed universe. Certainly one of the better volumes in the Crossed canon and a Thumbs Up!show more
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