Country of My Skull

Country of My Skull

Paperback

By (author) Antjie Krog

USD$13.18
List price $17.12
You save $3.94 23% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 1 business day
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: VINTAGE
  • Format: Paperback | 464 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 190mm x 30mm | 322g
  • Publication date: 4 November 1999
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0099289792
  • ISBN 13: 9780099289791
  • Sales rank: 82,392

Product description

The first free elections in South Africa's history were held in 1994. Within a year legislation was drafted to create a Truth and Reconcilliation Commission to establish a picture of the gross human rights violations committed between 1960 and 1993. It was to seek the truth and make it known to the public and to prevent these brutal events ever happening again. From 1996 and over the following two years South Africans were exposed almost daily to revelations about their traumatic past. Antije Krog's full account of the Commission's work using the testimonies of the oppressed and oppressors alike is a harrowing and haunting book in which the voices of ordinary people shape the course of history. WINNER OF SOUTH AFRICA'S SUNDAY TIMES ALAN PATON AWARD

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Author information

Antjie Krog was born in 1952 in Kroonstad, a town in the Free State province of South Africa. She has published eight volumes of poetry, several of which have been translated into European languages and have won international prizes. Reporting as Antjie Samuel, the author and her SABC radio team received the Pringle Award for excellence in journalism for reporting on the Truth and Reconcilliation Commission. Krog also won the Foreign Correspondents' Award for outstanding journalism for her articles on the Truth Commission. She went on to become parliamentary editor for SABC radio in 1997 and has since been appointed as an Extraordinary Professor in the Arts Faculty at the University of the Western Cape. Antjie Krog is married and is the mother of four children.

Review quote

"One of the best books of the year" The Economist "No one will tell us more about the struggle for the Afrikaner's soul; for this book, like the events it reports, is an act of redemption" Daily Telegraph "Krog's account of the hearings, which recorded 20,000 statements from victims and nearly 8,000 applications for amnesty, is vivid and impassioned" Mail on Sunday "Whatever it is that makes a major lasting work of non-fiction, it is here" Observer "Her accounts are so powerful, her resilience, humour and compassion so engaging...to have written this book is heroic" Sunday Times

Editorial reviews

When the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission was set up in 1995, its detractors thought that it was merely a convenient way to wash away the terrible, brutal history of apartheid. However, this powerful, disturbing and honest story of the Commission's work is an amazing testament to its purpose: the awful, personal stories of pain and guilt reveal a history which could never have come to light amid prosecutions and recriminations. Krog, an award-winning journalist and poet, gives us a passionate insight into the heart of South Africa. (Kirkus UK)

Flap copy

Ever since Nelson Mandela dramatically walked out of prison in 1990 after twenty-seven years behind bars, South Africa has been undergoing a radical transformation. In one of the most miraculous events of the century, the oppressive system of apartheid was dismantled. Repressive laws mandating separation of the races were thrown out. The country, which had been carved into a crazy quilt that reserved the most prosperous areas for whites and the most desolate and backward for blacks, was reunited. The dreaded and dangerous security force, which for years had systematically tortured, spied upon, and harassed people of color and their white supporters, was dismantled. But how could this country--one of spectacular beauty and promise--come to terms with its ugly past? How could its people, whom the oppressive white government had pitted against one another, live side by side as friends and neighbors? To begin the healing process, Nelson Mandela created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, headed by the renowned cleric Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Established in 1995, the commission faced the awesome task of hearing the testimony of the victims of apartheid as well as the oppressors. Amnesty was granted to those who offered a full confession of any crimes associated with apartheid. Since the commission began its work, it has been the central player in a drama that has riveted the country. In this book, Antjie Krog, a South African journalist and poet who has covered the work of the commission, recounts the drama, the horrors, the wrenching personal stories of the victims and their families. Through the testimonies of victims of abuse and violence, from the appearance of Winnie Mandela toformer South African president P. W. Botha's extraordinary courthouse press conference, this award-winning poet leads us on an amazing journey. Country of My Skull captures the complexity of the Truth Commission's work. The narrative is often traumatic, vivid, and provocative. Krog's powerful prose lures the reader actively and inventively through a mosaic of insights, impressions, and secret themes. This compelling tale is Antjie Krog's profound literary account of the mending of a country that was in colossal need of change.