The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

Hardback Collector's Library

By (author) Alexandre Dumas, Afterword by Marcus Clapham

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  • Publisher: Collector's Library
  • Format: Hardback | 696 pages
  • Dimensions: 150mm x 157mm x 93mm | 351g
  • Publication date: 19 February 2004
  • Publication City/Country: Cirencester
  • ISBN 10: 1904633366
  • ISBN 13: 9781904633365
  • Edition: Abridged
  • Edition statement: Abridged edition
  • Sales rank: 81,682

Product description

The Count of Monte Cristo is the ultimate novel of retribution. Based on a true story, it recounts the story of Edouard Dantes, his betrayal, and imprisonment in the sinister Chateau d'If. Years later, Paris is intrigued by the mysterious Count of Monte Cristo, who bursts onto the Paris social scene with his millions. He encounters the three principal betrayers of Dantes who have prospered in the post-Napoleonic boom and, one by one, their lives fall apart. The book was a huge, popular success when it was first serialized in 1844, and remains the greatest tale of revenge.

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Author information

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) was the son of a Napoleonic general who was the illegitimate son of a minor aristocrat and a black slave. His literary career started in the 1820s, but his most productive period was the 1840s with "The Three Musketeers" and its sequels, and "The Count of Monte Cristo." He made a fortune and lost a fortune, and was declared bankrupt in 1850. His memoirs, published in 1852, run to 22 volumes, and he also wrote the delightful culinary dictionary "Le Grand Dictionaire de Cuisine." His illegitimate son, Alexandre Dumas (1824-1895), is best known for his play "La Dame aux Camelias," which achieved legendary status and as Verdi's "La Traviata, " became an opera.