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The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980: Vol 15

The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980: Vol 15

Hardback Complete Peanuts

By (author) Charles M. Schulz

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  • Publisher: Fantagraphics
  • Format: Hardback | 330 pages
  • Dimensions: 168mm x 218mm x 36mm | 907g
  • Publication date: 11 April 2011
  • Publication City/Country: Seattle
  • ISBN 10: 1606994387
  • ISBN 13: 9781606994382
  • Sales rank: 110,840

Product description

Charles Schulz enters his fourth decade as the greatest cartoonist of his generation, and Peanuts remains as fresh and lively as it ever was. (How do we know it s 1980? Well, for one thing Peppermint Patty gets herself those Bo-Derek-in-10 cornrows Peanuts timelessness occasionally shows a crack!) That said, The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 includes a number of classic storylines, including the month-long sequence in which an ill Charlie Brown is hospitalized (including a particularly spooky moment when he wonders if he s died and nobody s told him yet), and an especially eventful trek with Snoopy, Woodstock, and the scout troop (now including a little girl bird, Harriet). And Snoopy is still trying on identities left and right, including the world-famous surveyor, the world-famous census taker, and Blackjack Snoopy, the riverboat gambler. In other extended stories, Snoopy launches an ill-fated airline (with Lucy as the agent, Linus as the luggage handler, and Marcie as what it was still OK then to call the stewardess) Peppermint Patty responds to being leaked upon by a ceiling by hiring a lawyer (unfortunately, she again picks Snoopy) plus one of the great, forgotten romances of Peanuts that will startle even long-time Peanuts connoisseurs: Peppermint Patty and Pig-Pen ?!"

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Frank is no longer simply the prototypical funny-animal; he has now become the everyman, too. It is in this capacity that we root for the rascal: his struggles against the workaday world are our own, as are his temptations, his trials, his longing for home and for some kind of domestic bliss. --Sean Rogers"