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    Come, Tell Me How You Live: An Archaeological Memoir (Paperback) By (author) Agatha Christie

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    DescriptionAgatha Christie's memoirs about her travels to Syria and Iraq in the 1930s with her archaeologist husband Max Mallowan Agatha Christie was already well known as a crime writer when she accompanied her husband, Max Mallowan, to Syria and Iraq in the 1930s. She took enormous interest in all his excavations, and when friends asked what her strange life was like, she decided to answer their questions in this delightful book. First published in 1946, Come, Tell Me How You Live is now reissued in B format. It gives a charming picture of Agatha Christie herself, and is, as Jacquetta Hawkes concludes in her Introduction, 'a pure pleasure to read'.


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    This book is a gem!5

    Jill Henderson This book is a gem if you are interested in reading memoirs, history and/or reading about Agatha Christie's life in general. Set in Syria during the early 1930s, it's an account of her life there while she accompanied her husband Max Mallowan on his archaeological excavations.

    A simpler time when archaeology wasn't weighed down with science and techniques. All you had to do, it seems, is catch a steam train at Victoria Station in London, transfer to the Orient Express in Calais and continue your journey to Istanbul. Once there, you were provided with digging permits by the French.

    But a comfortable holiday it was not. There were many discomforts in the primitive conditions of the day. Nevertheless, Agatha Christie finds intense enjoyment in the wild Mesopotamian countryside and with its people. Coping with fleas, spiders, mice, bats, cars break downs, the list goes on, but it is all told in the most amusing manner.

    And not only did she take an active part in the practical aspects of the excavations such as photographing the finds (without the aid of a darkroom, no less) and cataloguing, Agatha Christie continued to write such books as Murder in Mesopotamia and Appointment with Death.

    I believe this book gives a charming picture of Agatha Christie herself. What a wonderful gal she must have been. by Jill Henderson

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