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Come to Me: Stories

Come to Me: Stories

Paperback

By (author) Amy Bloom

List price $24.89

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Paperback $9.89
  • Publisher: PICADOR
  • Format: Paperback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 197mm x 12mm | 130g
  • Publication date: 9 June 1995
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0330339885
  • ISBN 13: 9780330339889
  • Sales rank: 531,015

Product description

'This debut collection, human and humorous, is an impressive display ...Bloom is uncensorious, revelling in the predicaments she has created for her protagonists and their instinct for survival ...She has great flexibility of narrative voice, whether as a middle-aged furrier in love with a schoolgirl or a young boy who accidentally shoots his cousin with his father's gun' The Times 'Bereavement, moral breakdown and sexual non-conformity are the deep waters into which Amy Bloom plunges in her first book -- though causing scarcely a ripple in the smooth narrative surface ...Bloom's advice seems to be: whatever it takes to scrape through life, do it -- grand gesture or compromise, sex or shopping' Independent on Sunday 'Amy Bloom's debut collection is a book which beckons if it is put down unfinished, and which -- although contemporary -- provides all the engrossing satisfaction of a nineteenth-century novel' Guardian 'An impressive addition to the booming renaissance in the American short story. Bloom has all the elegant acuity of a modern day Flannery O'Connor ...Her style is astonishingly versatile: wry and acerbic one minute; generous and passionate the next' GQ 'This is truly a collection that leaves the reader in a state of grace' Sunday Times

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Author information

Amy Bloom is the author of two novels, three collections of short stories, and a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. She has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, among many other publications, and has won a National Magazine Award. She lives in Connecticut and is Wesleyan University's Writer-in-Residence.

Review quote

'This debut collection, human and humorous, is an impressive display ... Bloom is uncensorious, revelling in the predicaments she has created for her protagonists and their instinct for survival ... She has great flexibility of narrative voice, whether as a middle-aged furrier in love with a schoolgirl or a young boy who accidentally shoots his cousin with his father's gun' The Times 'Bereavement, moral breakdown and sexual non-conformity are the deep waters into which Amy Bloom plunges in her first book -- though causing scarcely a ripple in the smooth narrative surface ... Bloom's advice seems to be: whatever it takes to scrape through life, do it -- grand gesture or compromise, sex or shopping' Independent on Sunday 'Amy Bloom's debut collection is a book which beckons if it is put down unfinished, and which -- although contemporary -- provides all the engrossing satisfaction of a nineteenth-century novel' Guardian 'An impressive addition to the booming renaissance in the American short story. Bloom has all the elegant acuity of a modern day Flannery O'Connor ... Her style is astonishingly versatile: wry and acerbic one minute; generous and passionate the next' GQ 'This is truly a collection that leaves the reader in a state of grace' Sunday Times

Editorial reviews

A practicing psychotherapist's splendid, sometimes shocking first collection of stories, some of which have been selected by The Best American Short Stories (1991 and 1992). Each of these 14 family-centric pieces involves trespass. In the elegant, disturbing opening story, "Love Is Not a Pie," the narrator breaks off her wedding engagement after realizing, during her mother's funeral, that a family friend named Mr. DeCuervo has for many years carried on an affair not just with her mother, as she and her sister had reluctantly concluded, but also with their big, gruff, Irish father, with whom DeCuervo tearily goes off to nap after the mother's burial. In "Sleepwalking," a bereaved wife lets her beloved 19-year-old stepson, who calls her "Mom," seduce her. In "Hyacinths," six-year-old David accidentally shoots and kills his young cousin in his widowed father's barn; then his father attempts to shoot him in retribution but is stopped by his aunt and uncle, who adopt the boy. This same boy turns out when grown to be David, the husband of Galen, protagonist or peripheral character in many of the later stories gathered here: for example, in one about Galen's adulterous suburban fling with handsome neighbor Henry DiMartino; in another about Henry's conventional wife's subsequent weird and touching love affair with a transvestite hairdresser; and, most notably and powerfully, in the prize-winning "Silver Water," about the mercy killing of one of Galen's daughters - a hopeless schizophrenic named Rose - by the other, kind and clearheaded Violet, who finds Rose lying on the family lawn late one night, overdosing on sleeping pills, and sits beside her while she dies. There's much more, and all of it worth a reader's time. Bloom is an acute, poker-faced observer and a gifted writer. (Kirkus Reviews)