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    Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 B.C. to A.D.700 (Ancient Society and History) (Hardback) By (author) Kenneth W. Harl

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    DescriptionThe premier form of Roman money since the time of the Second Punic War (218-201 B.C.), coins were vital to the success of Roman state finances, taxation, markets, and commerce beyond the frontiers. Yet until now, the economic and social history of Rome has been written independently of numismatic studies, which detail such technical information as weight standards, mint output, hoards, and finds at archaeological sites. In Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 B.C. to A.D. 700, noted classicist and numismatist Kenneth W. Harl brings together these two fields in the first comprehensive history of how Roman coins were minted and used. Drawing on literary and documentary sources as well as on current methods of metallurgical study and statistical analysis of coins from archaeological sites, Harl presents a sweeping overview of a system of coinage in use for more than a millennium. Challenging much recent scholarship, he emphasizes the important role played by coins in the overseas expansion of the Roman Republic during the second century B.C., in imperial inflationary policies during the third and fourth centuries A.D., and in the dissolution of the Roman Mediterranean order in the seventh century A. D. He also offers the first region-by-region analysis of prices and wages throughout Roman history with reference to the changing buying power of the major circulating denominations. And he shows how the seldom-studied provincial, civic, and imitative coinages were in fact important components of Roman currency. Richly illustrated with photographic reproductions of nearly three hundred specimens, Coinage in the Roman Economy offers a significant contribution to Roman economic history. It will be of interest to scholars and students of classical antiquity and the Middle Ages, as well as to professional and amateur numismatists.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 B.C. to A.D.700

    Title
    Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 B.C. to A.D.700
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Kenneth W. Harl
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 472
    Width: 142 mm
    Height: 221 mm
    Thickness: 41 mm
    Weight: 748 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780801852916
    ISBN 10: 0801852919
    Classifications

    B&T General Subject: 140
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.1
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBLA
    LC subject heading:
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1QDAR
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BIC subject category V2: KCZ
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 05
    Ingram Theme: CULT/ITALY, CHRN/ANCIEN
    Ingram Subject Code: AO
    Libri: I-AO
    B&T Approval Code: A14202040
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002020
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14260
    BIC subject category V2: WCF, 1QDAR
    DC22: 737.4937
    BISAC V2.8: ANT011000
    LC subject heading: , ,
    B&T Approval Code: A18320000
    DC20: 737.4937
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: CJ843 .H35 1996
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: CJ843.H35
    Thema V1.0: NHB, KCZ, NHC, WCF
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Illustrations note
    285 b&w illus.
    Publisher
    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint name
    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Publication date
    12 July 1996
    Publication City/Country
    Baltimore, MD
    Author Information
    Kenneth W. Harl, professor of history and Fellow of the American Numismatic Society, teaches classical and Byzantine history at Tulane University. He is the author of Civic Coins and Civic Politics in the Roman East, A.D. 180-275.
    Review quote
    This thought-provoking work... should be important reading for scholars in a variety of disciplines. It challenges, for example, the long-held belief that a large-scale drain of Roman specie went to India and the East in the early centuries of the Roman Empire and the concept that the western provinces of the Roman Empire were never completely monetized. These reinterpretations and others, presented forcefully with careful documentation, should arouse the attention of anyone interested in ancient or medieval history, economics, or numismatics. History
    Back cover copy
    The premier form of Roman money since the time of the Second Punic War (218-201 B.C.), coins were vital to the success of Roman state finances, taxation, markets, and commerce beyond the frontiers. Yet until now, the economic and social history of Rome has been written independently of numismatic studies, which detail such technical information as weight standards, mint output, hoards, and finds at archaeological sites. In Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 B.C. to A.D. 700, noted classicist and numismatist Kenneth W. Harl brings together these two fields in the first comprehensive history of how Roman coins were minted and used. Drawing on both literary and documentary sources, as well as on current methods of metallurgical study and statistical analysis of coins from archaeological sites, Harl presents a sweeping overview of a system of coinage in use for more than a millennium. Challenging much recent scholarship, he emphasizes the important role played by coins during overseas expansion of the Roman Republic during the second century B.C., in imperial inflationary policies during the third and fourth centuries A.D., and in the dissolution of the Roman Mediterranean order in the seventh century A.D. He also offers the first region-by-region analysis of prices and wages throughout Roman history with reference to the changing buying power of the major circulating denominations. And he shows how the seldom studied provincial, civic, and imitative coinages were in fact important components of Roman currency. Richly illustrated with photographic reproductions of nearly three hundred specimens, Coinage in the Roman Economy offers a significant contribution to Roman economic history. It willbe of interest to scholars and students of classical antiquity and the Middle Ages as well as to professional and amateur numismatists.