A Clergyman's Daughter

A Clergyman's Daughter

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Intimidated by her father, the rector of Knype Hill, Dorothy performs her submissive roles of dutiful daughter and bullied housekeeper. Her thoughts are taken up with the costumes she is making for the church school play, by the hopelessness of preaching to the poor and by debts she cannot pay in 1930s Depression England. Suddenly her routine shatters and Dorothy finds herself down and out in London. She is wearing silk stockings, has money in her pocket and cannot remember her name. Orwell leads us through a landscape of unemployment, poverty and hunger, where Dorothy's faith is challenged by a social reality that changes her life.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 320 pages
  • 130 x 198 x 20mm | 222.26g
  • Penguin Books Ltd
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0141184655
  • 9780141184654
  • 70,187

About George Orwell

Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory Animal Farm was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include Burmese Days, Down and Out in Paris and London, The Road to Wigan Pier and Homage to Catalonia.show more

Review Text

Orwell follows diverse tracks. Those who liked the stark realism and human drama of Down and Out in Paris and London will find this out of drawing and disappointing. Those who liked the color and pattern of Burmese Days will be equally disappointed. Frankly. I found The Clergyman's Daughter an unconvincing and unpleasant book. The story of a girl in the groove of a village parson's daughter's life; who escaped into sordidness and disillusionment through amnesia, and who slipped back once she was rescued from the mess of the life she had made for herself on the outside. Pass it up. (Kirkus Reviews)show more