Civil Engineering Hydraulics

Civil Engineering Hydraulics

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By (author) Martin Marriott

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  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (an imprint of John Wiley & Sons Ltd)
  • Format: Paperback | 424 pages
  • Dimensions: 170mm x 244mm x 26mm | 898g
  • Publication date: 20 July 2009
  • Publication City/Country: Chicester
  • ISBN 10: 1405161957
  • ISBN 13: 9781405161954
  • Edition: 5, Revised
  • Edition statement: 5th Revised edition
  • Sales rank: 190,462

Product description

This thorough update of a well-established textbook covers a core subject taught on every civil engineering course. Now expanded to cover environmental hydraulics and engineering hydrology, it has been revised to reflect current practice and course requirements. As previous editions, it includes substantial worked example sections with an on-line solution manual. A strength of the book has always been in its presentation these exercises which has distinguished it from other books on hydraulics, by enabling students to test their understanding of the theory and of the methods of analysis and design. Civil Engineering Hydraulics provides a succinct introduction to the theory of civil engineering hydraulics, together with a large number of worked examples and exercise problems with answers. Each chapter includes a worked example section with solutions; a list of recommended reading; and exercise problems with answers to enable students to assess their understanding. The book will be invaluable throughout a student's entire course - but particularly for first and second year study, and will also be welcomed by practising engineers as a concise reference.

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Author information

Martin Marriott is Principal Lecturer in the School of Computing, Information Technology and Engineering, University of East London. He is a chartered civil engineer, with degrees from the Universities of Cambridge, London (Imperial College) and Hertfordshire. He has wide professional experience in the UK and overseas with major firms of consulting engineers, followed by many years experience as a lecturer in higher education. He is a former Branch Chairman of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, and has served as Chief Examiner for the Engineering Council Graduate Diploma paper in Hydraulics and Hydrology.

Back cover copy

This thorough update of a well-established textbook provides a succinct introduction to the theory of civil engineering hydraulics. Now expanded to cover environmental hydraulics and engineering hydrology, this fifth edition has been revised to reflect current practice and course requirements.Substantial worked example sections are included, plus a wealth of additional exercise problems with an on-line solutions manual - see www.wiley.com/go/marriott. A strength of the book has always been its presentation of these exercises, distinguishing it from other books on hydraulics and enabling students to test their understanding of both the theory and the methods of analysis and design. This will appeal to lecturers and students keen to engage in student-centred learning. "Civil Engineering Hydraulics" will be invaluable throughout a student's entire course, from initial principles through to more advanced applications. By concentrating on the most commonly faced problems encountered by civil engineers in hydraulic engineering, it will also be welcomed by practising engineers as a concise reference.

Table of contents

Preface to Fifth Edition. Preface to Fourth Edition. About the Authors. Symbols. 1 Properties of Fluids. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Engineering units 1 1.3 Mass density and specific weight. 1.4 Relative density. 1.5 Viscosity of fluids. 1.6 Compressibility and elasticity of fluids. 1.7 Vapour pressure of liquids. 1.8 Surface tension and capillarity. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 2 Fluid Statics. 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 Pascal's law. 2.3 Pressure variation with depth in a static incompressible fluid. 2.4 Pressure measurement. 2.5 Hydrostatic thrust on plane surfaces. 2.6 Pressure diagrams. 2.7 Hydrostatic thrust on curved surfaces. 2.8 Hydrostatic buoyant thrust. 2.9 Stability of floating bodies. 2.10 Determination of metacentre. 2.11 Periodic time of rolling (or oscillation) of a floating body. 2.12 Liquid ballast and the effective metacentric height. 2.13 Relative equilibrium. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 3 Fluid Flow Concepts and Measurements. 3.1 Kinematics of fluids. 3.2 Steady and unsteady flows. 3.3 Uniform and non-uniform flows. 3.4 Rotational and irrotational flows. 3.5 One-, two- and three-dimensional flows. 3.6 Streamtube and continuity equation. 3.7 Accelerations of fluid particles. 3.8 Two kinds of fluid flow. 3.9 Dynamics of fluid flow. 3.10 Energy equation for an ideal fluid flow. 3.11 Modified energy equation for real fluid flows. 3.12 Separation and cavitation in fluid flow. 3.13 Impulse-momentum equation. 3.14 Energy losses in sudden transitions. 3.15 Flow measurement through pipes. 3.16 Flow measurement through orifices and mouthpieces. 3.17 Flow measurement in channels. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 4 Flow of Incompressible Fluids in Pipelines. 4.1 Resistance in circular pipelines flowing full. 4.2 Resistance to flow in non-circular sections. 4.3 Local losses. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 5 Pipe Network Analysis. 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 The head balance method ('loop' method). 5.3 The quantity balance method ('nodal' method). 5.4 The gradient method. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 6 Pump-Pipeline System Analysis and Design. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Hydraulic gradient in pump-pipeline systems. 6.3 Multiple pump systems. 6.4 Variable-speed pump operation. 6.5 Suction lift limitations. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 7 Boundary Layers on Flat Plates and in Ducts. 7.1 Introduction. 7.2 The laminar boundary layer. 7.3 The turbulent boundary layer. 7.4 Combined drag due to both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. 7.5 The displacement thickness. 7.6 Boundary layers in turbulent pipe flow. 7.7 The laminar sub-layer. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 8 Steady Flow in Open Channels. 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Uniform flow resistance. 8.3 Channels of composite roughness. 8.4 Channels of compound section. 8.5 Channel design. 8.6 Uniform flow in part-full circular pipes. 8.7 Steady, rapidly varied channel flow energy principles. 8.8 The momentum equation and the hydraulic jump. 8.9 Steady gradually varied open channel flow. 8.10 Computations of gradually varied flow. 8.11 The direct step method. 8.12 The standard step method. 8.13 Canal delivery problems. 8.14 Culvert flow. 8.15 Spatially varied flow in open channels. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 9 Dimensional Analysis, Similitude and Hydraulic Models. 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Dimensional analysis. 9.3 Physical significance of non-dimensional groups. 9.4 The Buckingham pi theorem. 9.5 Similitude and model studies. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 10 Ideal Fluid Flow and Curvilinear Flow. 10.1 Ideal fluid flow. 10.2 Streamlines, the stream function. 10.3 Relationship between discharge and stream function. 10.4 Circulation and the velocity potential function. 10.5 Stream functions for basic flow patterns. 10.6 Combinations of basic flow patterns. 10.7 Pressure at points in the flow field. 10.8 The use of flow nets and numerical methods. 10.9 Curvilinear flow of real fluids. 10.10 Free and forced vortices. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 11 Gradually Varied Unsteady Flow from Reservoirs. 11.1 Discharge between reservoirs under varying head. 11.2 Unsteady flow over a spillway. 11.3 Flow establishment. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 12 Mass Oscillations and Pressure Transients in Pipelines. 12.1 Mass oscillation in pipe systems - surge chamber operation. 12.2 Solution neglecting tunnel friction and throttle losses for sudden discharge stoppage. 12.3 Solution including tunnel and surge chamber losses for sudden discharge stoppage. 12.4 Finite difference methods in the solution of the surge chamber equations. 12.5 Pressure transients in pipelines (waterhammer). 12.6 The basic differential equations of waterhammer. 12.7 Solutions of the waterhammer equations. 12.8 The Allievi equations. 12.9 Alternative formulation. Worked examples. References and recomended reading. Problems. 13 Unsteady Flow in Channels. 13.1 Introduction. 13.2 Gradually varied unsteady flow. 13.3 Surges in open channels. 13.4 The upstream positive surge. 13.5 The downstream positive surge. 13.6 Negative surge waves. 13.7 The dam break. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 14 Uniform Flow in Loose-Boundary Channels. 14.1 Introduction. 14.2 Flow regimes. 14.3 Incipient (threshold) motion. 14.4 Resistance to flow in alluvial (loose-bed) channels. 14.5 Velocity distributions in loose-boundary channels. 14.6 Sediment transport. 14.7 Bed load transport. 14.8 Suspended load transport. 14.9 Total load transport. 14.10 Regime channel design. 14.11 Rigid-bed channels with sediment transport. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 15 Hydraulic Structures. 15.1 Introduction. 15.2 Spillways. 15.3 Energy dissipators and downstream scour protection. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. 16 Environmental Hydraulics and Engineering Hydrology. 16.1 Introduction. 16.2 Analysis of gauged river flow data. 16.3 River Thames discharge data. 16.4 Flood alleviation, sustainability and environmental channels. 16.5 Project appraisal. Worked examples. References and recommended reading. Problems. Answers. Index.