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    City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi (Paperback) By (author) William Dalrymple

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    Description'Could you show me a djinn?' I asked. 'Certainly,' replied the Sufi. 'But you would run away.' From the author of the Samuel Johnson prize shortlisted 'The Return of a King', this is William Dalrymple's captivating memoir of a year spent in Delhi, a city watched over and protected by the mischievous invisible djinns. Lodging with the beady-eyed Mrs Puri and encountering an extraordinary array of characters - from elusive eunuchs to the last remnants of the Raj - William Dalrymple comes to know the bewildering city intimately. He pursues Delhi's interlacing layers of history along narrow alleys and broad boulevards, brilliantly conveying its intoxicating mix of mysticism and mayhem. 'City of Djinns' is an astonishing and sensitive portrait of a city, and confirms William Dalrymple as one of the most compelling explorers of India's past and present.


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  • Full bibliographic data for City of Djinns

    Title
    City of Djinns
    Subtitle
    A Year in Delhi
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) William Dalrymple
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 352
    Width: 132 mm
    Height: 194 mm
    Thickness: 24 mm
    Weight: 259 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780006375951
    ISBN 10: 0006375952
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: TRV
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T8.5
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1FKA
    BIC subject category V2: WTL
    LC classification: DS486.D3D2
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 08
    DC22: 954/.56
    LC classification: DS486.D3 D27 1994
    LC subject heading: , ,
    B&T General Subject: 800
    B&T Approval Code: A19242020
    DC21: 954.56052
    Libri: INDI2472
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 13300
    BISAC V2.8: TRV003040
    Thema V1.0: WTL
    Illustrations note
    15 b/w illus
    Publisher
    HarperCollins Publishers
    Imprint name
    Flamingo
    Publication date
    01 May 1996
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    William Dalrymple's first book, 'In Xanadu', won the Yorkshire Post Best First Work Award and the Scottish Arts Council Spring Book Award. His third, 'From the Holy Mountain', won the Scottish Arts Council Autumn Book Award and was shortlisted for the 1998 Thomas Cook Award. His fourth, 'The Age of Kali', was published in November 1998. He is the youngest Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and has written and presented a six-part series on the buildings of the Raj for Channel 4.
    Review quote
    'Delightful ... Surely one of the funniest books about India' Times Literary Supplement 'Scholarly and marvellously entertaining ... a considerable feat' Dervla Murphy, Spectator 'Dalrymple has pulled it off again' Jan Morris, Independent
    Review text
    A charming portrait of the ancient Indian capital of Delhi by a talented young British travel writer. Dalrymple, whose debut book of travel writing, In Xanadu (not reviewed), received much praise, spent a year wandering around the dilapidated city of Delhi uncovering the layers of history found in its architectural and human ruins. With his wife, Olivia Fraser (whose pen-and-ink illustrations help the book along), Dalrymple finds a Delhi that is still trying to overcome the traumas of British colonialism and the partition of 1947, in which most Muslims migrated from India to the newly created Pakistan and many Hindus, expelled from the Punjab, fled to Delhi, creating a new, less sophisticated class of resident. The title refers to the spirits that according to legend have, throughout the ages, watched over the inhabitants of Delhi. At first, Dalrymple finds that much of the old life, including the belief in djinns, seems to have faded; but after some digging, he learns that these old customs are simply hidden and very much alive. Judiciously parceling out strands of Indian history, Dalrymple shows that the unique Delhi ways have always been able to withstand the worst of wars and other calamities. He takes us, in an affable style, through the sprawling city and introduces us to the frugal Punjabi people who now make up the majority of the population, as well as to the remnants of the old colonialists, and then to the fascinating ways of people of the underbelly - the sad, regimented lives of contemporary eunuchs, the tenacity of the squatters, and the timeless world of the many religions that have quietly coexisted for centuries in the chaotic warrens of the indestructible city. Not a heavyweight experience, but this warm look at Delhi is a pleasant starting point for anyone interested in this mysterious city. (Kirkus Reviews)