• Citizen Soldiers: U.S.Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge, to the Surrender of Germany, June 7, 1944 to May 7, 1945 See large image

    Citizen Soldiers: U.S.Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge, to the Surrender of Germany, June 7, 1944 to May 7, 1945 (Paperback) By (author) Stephen E. Ambrose

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    DescriptionIn this riveting account, historian Stephen Ambrose continues where he left off in his #1 bestseller "D-Day". Ambrose again follows the individual characters of this noble, brutal, and tragic war, from the high command down to the ordinary soldier, drawing on hundreds of interviews to re-create the war experience with startling clarity and immediacy. From the hedgerows of Normandy to the overrunning of Germany, Ambrose tells the real story of World War II from the perspective of the men and women who fought it.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Citizen Soldiers

    Title
    Citizen Soldiers
    Subtitle
    U.S.Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge, to the Surrender of Germany, June 7, 1944 to May 7, 1945
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Stephen E. Ambrose
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 512
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 234 mm
    Thickness: 41 mm
    Weight: 658 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780684848013
    ISBN 10: 0684848015
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBWQ
    BIC time period qualifier V2: 3JJH
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.4
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DFG
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD, JWL
    LC subject heading: , , , , ,
    BIC subject category V2: JWD
    Ingram Theme: APPR/CLASSA, APPR/AWARD, CULT/WEUROP
    B&T General Subject: 520
    Ingram Subject Code: HM
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/1940
    Libri: I-HM
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27470
    BISAC V2.8: HIS027100
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 940.541273
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 940.54/21, 940.5421
    LC subject heading: ,
    BISAC V2.8: HIS027110
    LC classification: D756 .A52 1998B
    LC subject heading:
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Illustrations note
    b&w photographs, maps
    Publisher
    SIMON & SCHUSTER
    Imprint name
    POCKET BOOKS
    Publication date
    03 November 1998
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Review quote
    Kyle Smith People Ambrose proves once again he is a masterful historian....Spellbinding....The book captures the bizarre contradictions, random kindness and unexpectedly comic moments of the push to Berlin as memorably as a great war novel.
    Review text
    A worthy sequel to Ambrose's 1994 D-Day. Bestselling historian Ambrose (Undaunted Courage, 1996) uses firsthand recollections of combat veterans on both sides to flesh out his well-researched narrative. He picks up the epic drama by following, almost step by step, various individuals and outfits among the tens of thousands of young Allied soldiers who broke away from the deadly beaches of Normandy and swept across France to the Ardennes, fought the Battle of the Bulge, captured the famed bridge at Remagen, and crossed the wide Rhine to final victory in Europe. Ambrose observes that the US broke the Nazi war machine with massive aerial bombing, artillery, and the great mobility of attacking tanks and infantry. But, he argues, it was not technology but the valor and character of the young GIs and their European counterparts that ultimately proved too much for the vaunted German forces. While generally approving of Allied military leadership, Ambrose faults Eisenhower and Bradley as too conservative and believes the great human and materiel cost of victory could have been reduced by adopting Patton's more innovative and bolder knockout movements. He deplores the sending of inadequately trained 18-year-olds as replacements on the front lines, where they suffered much higher casualty rates than the foxhole-wise GI veterans. The troops fought under the worst possible conditions in the Ardennes, during the worst winter in 40 years; Ambrose describes the long, freezing snowy nights; the wounds, frostbite, and trench foot; and the fatigue and the tensions of facing sudden death or maiming. The troops rallied to drive the enemy back to the Rhine and into Germany, but took some 80,000 casualties. With remarkable immediacy and clarity, as though he had trained a telescopic lens on the battlefields, Ambrose offers a stirring portrayal of the terror and courage experienced by men at war. (Kirkus Reviews)