Churchill's Wizards

Churchill's Wizards : The British Genius for Deception, 1914-1945

By (author) Nicholas Rankin

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The real story of how Winston Churchill and the British mastered deception to defeat the Nazis - by conning the Kaiser, hoaxing Hitler and using brains to outwit brawn. By June 1940, most of Europe had fallen to the Nazis and Britain stood alone. So, with Winston Churchill in charge the British bluffed their way out of trouble, drawing on the trickery which had helped them win the First World War. They broadcast outrageous British propaganda on pretend German radio stations, broke German secret codes and eavesdropped on their messages. Every German spy in Britain was captured and many were used to send back false information to their controllers. Forged documents misled their intelligence. Bogus wireless traffic from entire phantom armies, dummy airfields with model planes, disguised ships and inflatable rubber tanks created a vital illusion of strength. Culminating in the spectacular misdirection that was so essential to the success of D-Day in 1944, Churchill's Wizards: The British Genius for Deception 1914-1945 is a thrilling work of popular military history filled with almost unbelievable stories of bravery, creativity and deception. Nicholas Rankin is the author of Dead Man's Chest, Telegram From Guernica and Ian Fleming's Commandos. "This is a story clamouring to be told. We could not have imagined the scope of the inventiveness, the daring of these people's imaginations...I could not stop reading this book." (Doris Lessing).

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  • Paperback | 688 pages
  • 128 x 196 x 46mm | 539.77g
  • 07 May 2009
  • FABER & FABER
  • London
  • English
  • Main
  • 0571221963
  • 9780571221967
  • 112,118

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Author Information

Nicholas Rankin spent twenty years broadcasting for BBC World Service where he was Chief Producer and won two UN awards. His first book for Faber, Dead Man's Chest, followed in Robert Louis Stevenson's footsteps from Scotland to Samoa and was much enjoyed by Graham Greene. His second, Telegram from Guernica, was a widely praised biography of the groundbreaking war-correspondent and front-line propagandist George Lowther Steer. His bestselling Churchill's Wizards, was 'a completely delightful and entertaining read' in the Daily Telegraph. His most recent book is Ian Fleming's Commandos.

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