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    Chekhov: Scenes from a Life (Paperback) By (author) Rosamund Bartlett

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    DescriptionRosamund Bartlett is steeped in Chekhov's writings, having worked as a translator and lecturer on the culture and history of nineteenth-century Russia. She has written not simply another biography of Chekhov but brought new understanding to the writings and character of the man, set amidst the formidable landscape of the Russia he loved. This is a book of enormous detail about the places Chekhov visited and lived in, which is vital for a good understanding of the character of this unusual and complex man. The author examines with careful precision Chekhov's genius, and shows that he is not simply the gloomy writer of popular myth but one with profound humanity and humour.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Chekhov

    Title
    Chekhov
    Subtitle
    Scenes from a Life
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Rosamund Bartlett
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 432
    Width: 130 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 27 mm
    Weight: 349 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780743230759
    ISBN 10: 0743230752
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25710
    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T2.0
    BIC E4L: LIT
    B&T General Subject: 170
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 03
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    Ingram Subject Code: BA
    Libri: I-BA
    DC22: B
    BISAC V2.8: BIO007000
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: H5
    BIC subject category V2: D
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 891.723
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: A24363050
    LC classification: PG3458
    DC22: 891.72/3
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: PG3458 .B37 2005
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Illustrations note
    illustrations
    Publisher
    Simon & Schuster Ltd
    Imprint name
    Free Press
    Publication date
    01 August 2005
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Review quote
    "An excellent new biography, in fine Chekhovian style, by a writer with a deep knowledge of Russian culture and nature." --"Evening Standard"
    Review text
    A peculiar biography that justifies its addition to an overcrowded shelf by focusing on the landscapes most important to the Russian writer. It's a good idea-for a magazine article or an academic monograph. Drawn out to book length, this geographical survey eventually palls as the text wanders from Taganrog, where Chekhov was born in 1860, through Moscow and St. Petersburg to Melikhovo, his country home outside Moscow, and Yalta, the Crimean resort to which he relocated in a vain attempt to stem the progress of his tuberculosis. British scholar Bartlett (Russian/Univ. of Durham; Wagner and Russia, not reviewed) admits to taking "an impressionistic approach," and early chapters provide atmospheric context for his work by the evoking flat, unpopulated steppe, dotted with ancient Scythian burial mounds, of his childhood; and the arcadian meadows, forests and rivers he enjoyed when summering in a dacha outside Moscow. But her occasional schematic linking of these vistas to a particular story through lengthy quotes merely serves to underscore how little information this book provides about Chekhov's literary life, apart from his surprising friendship with reactionary St. Petersburg magazine publisher Alexei Suvorin. The plays in particular get very short shrift here; in a typical passage, the author writes, "When [Chekhov] returned to Nice for that last visit, he spent the first week of his stay putting the final touches on Three Sisters"-which has hardly been mentioned before. Happily, we learn a good deal more about Chekhov the man than Chekhov the writer. He quietly improved every place he lived, treating the local peasants long after he had given up practicing medicine and raising funds for local schools and post offices. The chronology of his existence, largely abandoned for long stretches, reasserts itself in the final chapters about his slow decline and death at a German spa in 1904, which make the previous emphasis on the physical terrain seem even more arbitrary. Some interesting material on hitherto unexplored aspects of Chekhov's life, but this one's strictly for specialists. (Kirkus Reviews)