Catalogue 2.0
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Catalogue 2.0 : The Future of the Library Catalogue

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Description

Will there be a library catalogue in the future and, if so, what will it look like? In the last 25 years, the library catalogue has undergone an evolution, from card catalogues to OPACs, discovery systems and even linked data applications making library bibliographic data accessible on the web. At the same time, users expectations of what catalogues will be able to offer in the way of discovery have never been higher. This groundbreaking edited collection brings together some of the foremost international cataloguing practitioners and thought leaders, including Lorcan Dempsey, Emmanuelle Bermes, Marshall Breeding and Karen Calhoun, to provide an overview of the current state of the art of the library catalogue and look ahead to see what the library catalogue might become. Practical projects and cutting edge concepts are showcased in discussions of: * linked data and the Semantic Web * user expectations and needs * bibliographic control * the FRBRization of the catalogue * innovations in search and retrieval * next-generation discovery products and mobile catalogues. Readership: Cataloguers and metadata specialists, library adminstrators and managers responsible for planning and strategy, systems librarians, user services managers, electronic resources librarians, and digital library project managers, students on cataloguing, information management and digital library courses.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 154 x 232 x 16mm | 399.99g
  • Facet Publishing
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1856047164
  • 9781856047166
  • 635,033

Review quote

Catalogue 2.0 certainly has its value as a snapshot of where the library catalogue is today and an exploration of where it may be headed. While sections of the book are particularly relevant to technical services and systems librarians, it is certainly worth a read for anyone interested in both a summary of recent developments in and forecast for the library catalog. It could also serve as a reading for a course on library systems, and some of the individual chapters may be appropriate for other library courses as well. -- Library Resources and Technical Services Chambers has succeeded in editing an evocative and convincing work. Those seeking an authoritative description of this historical moment, of what Calhoun call this "era of discontinuous change", will be well served by this collection. -- Technicalities Catalogue 2.0 is valuable reading for anyone involved in providing a version of the library catalogue to users, which is most of us. -- Australian Library Journal What is the state of the library catalogue now, and what might it become in the future? Authors of this excellent book answer those questions through theoretical discussions and practical examples of what have been done by libraries. Written by an international team of library and information professionals, Catalogue 2.0 does not disappoint. -- Collection Management This book presents complex theoretical concepts well. It provides practical examples and case studies too. In my opinion it shows the Library Catalogue is alive and well - but is also evolving as the technological landscape and the needs and wishes of users evolve. I think it is essential reading and the broad range of topics covered give a good overview of the future of the catalogue. -- Managing Information This book is easy to read, and covers many issues in its 200 pages. The book encourages further discussion of the issues raised, rather than stating an immovable position. For this reason it is recommended as being suitable for students of library and information science, as well as cataloguers, systems librarians, managers, e-resources librarians and client services librarians. The sections on RDF will be of interest to all professionals working within cataloguing. -- Australian Academic and Research Librariesshow more

About Sally Chambers

Sally Chambers is a digital librarian, working as Secretary-General in the DARIAH-EU Coordination Office at the Gottingen Centre for Digital Humanities, Germany.show more

Table of contents

Foreword - Marshall Breeding Introduction - Sally Chambers 1. Next generation catalogues: what do users think? - Anne Christensen 2. Making search work for the library user - Till Kinstler 3. Next-generation discovery: an overview of the European Scene - Marshall Breeding 4. The mobile library catalogue - Lukas Koster and Driek Heesakkers 5. FRBRizing your catalogue - Rosemie Callewaert 6. Enabling your catalogue for the semantic web - Emmanuelle Bermes 7. Supporting digital scholarship: bibliographic control, library co-operatives and open access repositories - Karen Calhoun 8. Thirteen ways of look at the libraries, discovery and the catalogue: scale, workflow, attention - Lorcan Dempsey.show more