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The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future

The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future

Paperback

By (author) Robert Darnton

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  • Publisher: PublicAffairs,U.S.
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 142mm x 214mm x 20mm | 222g
  • Publication date: 9 September 2010
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 158648902X
  • ISBN 13: 9781586489021
  • Illustrations note: diagrams
  • Sales rank: 106,519

Product description

The era of the printed book is at a crossroad. E-readers are flooding the market, books are available to read on cell phones, and companies such as Google, Amazon, and Apple are competing to command near monopolistic positions as sellers and dispensers of digital information. Already, more books have been scanned and digitized than were housed in the great library in Alexandria. Is the printed book resilient enough to survive the digital revolution, or will it become obsolete? In this lasting collection of essays, Robert Darnton--an intellectual pioneer in the field of this history of the book--lends unique authority to the life, role, and legacy of the book in society.

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Author information

A former professor of European history at Princeton University, Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and director of the Harvard University Library. The founder of the Guttenberg-e program, he is the author of many books. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Review quote

Chronicle of Higher Education, August 29, 2010 "A useful text with which to muse on this subject is Robert Darnton's The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future (PublicAffairs, 2009). In it, the onetime newspaper reporter, distinguished scholar of the Enlightenment and the history of the book, and director of Harvard's libraries, swings between explanations and concerns about Google Book Search, and how the situation with books today looks in the perspective of history. Many of his observations give pause."