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Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain

Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain

Book rating: 05 Paperback

By (author) George Monbiot

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  • Publisher: Pan Books
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 197mm x 27mm | 295g
  • Publication date: 1 December 2001
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0330369431
  • ISBN 13: 9780330369435
  • Sales rank: 350,563

Product description

A devastating indictment of the corruption at the heart of the British State by one of our most popular media figures.George Monbiot made his name exposing the corruption of foreign governments; now he turns his keen eye on Britain. In the most explosive book on British politics of the new decade, Monbiot uncovers what many have suspected but few have been able to prove: that corporations have become so powerful they now threaten the foundations of democratic government.Many of the stories George Monbiot recounts have never been told before, and they could scarcely be more embarrassing to a government that claims to act on behalf of all of us. Some are - or should be - resigning matters. Effectively, the British government has collaborated in its own redundancy, by ceding power to international bodies controlled by corporations. CAPTIVE STATE highlights the long term threat to our society and ultimately shows us ways in which we can hope to withstand the might of big business.

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Author information

George Monbiot has been named by the Evening Standard as one of the twenty-five most influential people in Britain and by the Independent on Sunday as one of the forty international prophets of the twenty-first century. He is the author of the investigative travel books, Poisoned Arrows, Amazon Watershed and No Man's Land. He writes a column for the Guardian and is Honorary Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Keele, and Visiting Professor at the Department of Environmental Science, University of East London.

Customer reviews

By Enzo Short 18 Jul 2009 5

This book describes the corporate takeover of Britain. Another, by Paul Hellyer, called �¢??Stop, Think�¢?? (ISBN: 0969439466) describes the corporate takeover of the world. Both books could be subsumed under the subject matter of Neoliberalism, which is explained most excellently by David Harvey in his book �¢??A Brief History of Neoliberalism�¢?? (ISBN: 0199283273). Harvey explains the causations of the doctrine and its development in the last century, and its relevance (and more) to the current century. All three books show corporate (financial, commercial and industrial) greed reflected in history on a grand scale. Having not been stopped, the new world order has increasingly become one of domination by the power of greed.

Economics & politics (�¢??Ecopolinomics�¢??) are intertwined and inseparable, for humans are no different from other creatures in their quest to survive, even at the expense of their fellow creatures, whether inadvertently or wilfully. Which is why the understanding of economics & politics must be understood together, both historically and currently.

What these books show is very much related to the laissez-faire theory of the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723 - 1790), which was the belief that if mankind were given the freedom to act out of self-interest (selfishness?) and pursue maximum personal gain, the consequences would be �¢??most agreeable to the interests of the whole of society�¢?? (This is something of an irony, one could say).

The economist John Maynard Keynes (1883 - 1946) once said: �¢??The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else�¢??.

An antidote for nation states all over the world being held captive to corporate greed can be found in the use of simultaneous policies that can be examined at www.simpol.org
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Editorial reviews

New Labour's 'business friendly' policies are nothing short of a capitulation to the bug corporations says Monbiot in this trenchantly argued new book. The corporations are now taking over control of public assets on an unprecedented scale through such schemes as the PFI (Private Finance Initiative) while the provision of roads, prisons and hospitals is now deliberatley tailored to meet corporate demands, not public need. The rebranding of our national emblems goes on remorselessly as business logos appear on everything from street signs to the saddles used by the City of London mounted police. Planning pemissions are now routinely brought and sold, he claims; air-traffic control systems used threatened with privatization and Tony Blair boasts of Britain as having 'the most lightly regulated labour market of any in the developed world'. Never mind the cost in terms of falling health, safety, environment and labour protection standards. The obvious riposte to all this is to say that globalization and the new freedom it gives to corporations to relocate or move money around at will means that governments everywhere have lost for ever their power to control big business. Yet books like this one are necessary to mobilize political support for where the real battles now need to be fought - in the world Trade Organization where the future shape of the world economy and the lives of ordinary people at the most everyday level are at stake as never before. (Kirkus UK)