Cannery Row

Cannery Row

Paperback Penguin Modern Classics

By (author) John Steinbeck, Introduction by Susan Shillinglaw

$8.20
List price $14.22
You save $6.02 42% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Additional formats available

Format
Hardback $16.73
CD-Audio $16.23
  • Publisher: PENGUIN CLASSICS
  • Format: Paperback | 176 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 188mm x 8mm | 18g
  • Publication date: 7 September 2000
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0141185082
  • ISBN 13: 9780141185088
  • Sales rank: 14,123

Product description

John Steinbeck's paean to the Monterey County of his youth, "Cannery Row" contains an introduction by Susan Shillinglaw in "Penguin Modern Classics". In the din and stink that is "Cannery Row" a colourful blend of misfits - gamblers, whores, drunks, bums and artists - survive side by side in a jumble of adventure and mischief. Lee Chong, the astute owner of the well-stocked grocery store, is also the proprietor of the Palace Flophouse that Mack and his troupe of good-natured 'boys' call home. Dora runs the Bear Flag Restaurant with clockwork efficiency and a generous heart, and Doc, secreted away in his home at Western Biological Laboratories, is the fount of all wisdom. Packed with invention and ramshackle joie de vivre, "Cannery Row" is Steinbeck's high-spirited tribute to his native California. John Steinbeck (1902-68), winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for literature, is remembered as one of the greatest and best-loved American writers of the twentieth century. During the Second World War Steinbeck served as a war correspondent, his journalism later collected in "Once There Was a War" (1958), and he was awarded the Norwegian Cross of Freedom for his portrayal in "The Moon is Down" (1942) of Resistance efforts in northern Europe. His best-known works include the epics "The Grapes of Wrath" (1939) and "East of Eden" (1952), and his tragic novella "Of Mice and Men" (1937). John Steinbeck's complete works are published in "Penguin Modern Classics". If you enjoyed "Cannery Row" you might like Steinbeck's "Sweet Thursday", also available in "Penguin Modern Classics". "A very human writer; uninhibited, bawdy, and compassionate, inquisitive and deeply intelligent". ("Daily Telegraph").

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Author information

Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck is remembered as one of the greatest and best-loved American writers of the twentieth century. His complete works will be published in Penguin Modern Classics.

Editorial reviews

I loved it - and to my mind - it fits admirably an immediate need in our season's lists, - the need for a richly patterned story spun out of another layer of that peculiar underworld with which Steinbeck is at his best. Once again, as in Tortilla?? Flat, he makes no effort to stress "social significance". To be sure, one can strain at his underlying meanings and say that such people should not exist in today's plenty - but no one can argue that they wouldn't exist again tomorrow if eliminated today. Flotsam?? and jetsam of humanity, - the gang of boys who could get jobs but didn't except when emergency demanded - and then quit when the emergency passed. Lee's felicitous acquiescence to their thinly veiled urging that they become caretakers of his newly acquired shack; their neighbors in the deserted lot; Doc, high mogul of the marine laboratory, doctor to the neighborhood on occasion, beloved by all; and the others who made up the dregs of Cannery Row. The story builds up to first one and then another climax, as the boys plan a party for Doc. There's humor - and pathos - and sheer good story telling as the incidents unfold. The plot is tenuous, held together by the characters. But Steinbeck succeeds in making them human, likable, out of drawing but never in caricature. And one feels that to him, too, they are part of the flavor of a folk legend of today. (Kirkus Reviews)