The Cambridge Ancient History: Last Age of the Roman Republic, 146-43 BC v. 9

The Cambridge Ancient History: Last Age of the Roman Republic, 146-43 BC v. 9

Edited by J.A. Crook , Edited by Andrew William Lintott , Edited by Elizabeth Rawson

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Volume IX of the second edition of The Cambridge Ancient History has for its main theme the process commonly known as the 'Fall of the Roman Republic'. Chapters 1-12 supply a narrative of the period from 133 BC to the death of Cicero in 43 BC, with a prelude analysing the situation and problems of the Republic from the turning-point year 146 BC. Chapters 13-19 offer analysis of aspects of Roman society, institutions, and ideas during the period. The chapters treat public and private law, the beginnings of imperial administration, the economy of Rome and Italy, and the growth of the city of Rome, and finally intellectual life and religion. The portrait is of a society not in decay or decline but, rather, outstripping its strength and attracting the administrations of men who rescued it at the price of transforming it politically.

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  • Hardback | 920 pages
  • 156 x 230 x 56mm | 1,437.88g
  • 29 Apr 1994
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge
  • English
  • Revised
  • 2nd Revised edition
  • 2 b/w illus. 14 maps 1 table
  • 0521256038
  • 9780521256032
  • 591,062

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Review quote

"The new CAH IX is a welcome achievement, a readable and reliable political narrative with significant thematic contributions that mark major progress in sophistication and incisiveness of thought." The Classical Journal

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Back cover copy

In this book the chapters treat public and private law, the beginnings of imperial administration, the economy of Rome and Italy and the growth of the city of Rome, and finally intellectual life and religion. The portrait is of a society not in decay or decline, but, on the contrary, growing up so fast in international predominance and material prosperity, in cosmopolitanism of population and Hellenization of ideas, as finally to tumble over its own feet. It was destined only to be rescued at the price of political transformation.

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