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A Buddhist History of the West: Studies in Lack

A Buddhist History of the West: Studies in Lack

Paperback Suny Series in Religious Studies

By (author) David R. Loy

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  • Publisher: State University of New York Press
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 158mm x 233mm x 15mm | 349g
  • Publication date: 1 February 2002
  • Publication City/Country: Albany, NY
  • ISBN 10: 0791452603
  • ISBN 13: 9780791452608
  • Edition statement: New.
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 495,399

Product description

Roy (international studies, Bunkyo U., Japan) explores the Western desire to ground oneself or make oneself feel more real, arising from a self-conscious ungroundedness which we experience as a sense of lack . Using a contemporary Buddhist perspective, the author discusses ways that our understanding of this sense of lack has changed at important points in history, and the largely unconscious ways in which we have tried to resolve our lack. Issues covered include freedom, progress, delusive craving (for fame, romantic love, money), modernity, civil society, the "means/end problem in modern life," and the modern economic system. Earlier drafts of some of the chapters have been previously published in academic journals and books. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Review quote

"A polymath's tour through intellectual and social history, David Loy's Buddhist retelling goes far in revealing the historically conditioned limitations of many dominant Western terms, metaphors, and assumptions. By reinterpreting greed, ill will, and delusion as structural rather than personal problems, Loy offers a compassionate account of ways that we make ourselves unhappy and a trenchant critique of market capitalism's manipulation of these habits of mind."