The Brothers Karamazov
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The Brothers Karamazov

By (author) Fyodor Dostoyevsky , Translated by Constance Garnett

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Completed only two months before his death, "The Brothers Karamazov" is Dostoyevsky's largest, most expanisve, most life-embracing work. Filled with human passions lust, greed, love, jealousy, sorrow and humor the book is also infused with moral issues and the issue of collective guilt. As in many of Dostoyevsky's novels, the plot centers on a murder. Sucked into the crime's vortex are three brothers: Dmitri, a young officer utterly unrestrained in love, hatred, jealousy, and generosity; Ivan, an intellectual capable of delivering, impromptu, the most brilliant, lively, and unforgettable disquisitions about good and evil, God, and the devil; and Alyosha, the youngest brother, preternaturally patient, good, and loving. Part mystery, part profound philosophical and theological debate, "The Brothers Karamazov "pulls the reader in on many different levels. As the Introduction says, "The characters Dostoyevsky writes about, though they may not appear to be ones who live on our street, or even on any street, seem, in their passions and lack of self-control, the familiar and intimate denizens of our souls." It's no wonder that for many people "The Brothers Karamazov "is one of the greatest novels ever written."

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  • Paperback | 736 pages
  • 134.62 x 210.82 x 55.88mm | 521.63g
  • 26 Aug 2005
  • Dover Publications Inc.
  • New York
  • English
  • Unabridged
  • Unabridged
  • 0486437914
  • 9780486437910
  • 33,067

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Author Information

With his sympathetic portrayals of the downtrodden of 19th-century Russian society, Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821 1881) exercised immense influence on modern writers. His novels featured profound philosophical and psychological insights that anticipated the development of psychoanalysis and existentialism."

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Back cover copy

Completed only two months before his death, "The Brothers Karamazov" is Dostoyevsky's largest, most expanisve, most life-embracing work. Filled with human passions lust, greed, love, jealousy, sorrow and humor the book is also infused with moral issues and the issue of collective guilt. As in many of Dostoyevsky's novels, the plot centers on a murder. Sucked into the crime's vortex are three brothers: Dmitri, a young officer utterly unrestrained in love, hatred, jealousy, and generosity; Ivan, an intellectual capable of delivering, impromptu, the most brilliant, lively, and unforgettable disquisitions about good and evil, God, and the devil; and Alyosha, the youngest brother, preternaturally patient, good, and loving. Part mystery, part profound philosophical and theological debate, "The Brothers Karamazov "pulls the reader in on many different levels. As the Introduction says, "The characters Dostoyevsky writes about, though they may not appear to be ones who live on our street, or even on any street, seem, in their passions and lack of self-control, the familiar and intimate denizens of our souls." It's no wonder that for many people "The Brothers Karamazov "is one of the greatest novels ever written. Dover (2005) unabridged publication of the Constance Garnett translation as published by W. Heinemann, London, 1912-1920."

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Customer reviews

An Excellent Edition of an Excellent Novel

This book has had such a profound impact on my life. Dostoyevsky creates a wonderful cast of characters from the agnostic philosopher Ivan, the hedonistic father Fyodor, the devout Alyosha and the passionate Dmitri, and many others. In translation some things might be lost, but the translator of this edition doesn't fall into the trap that snares other Dostoyevsky translators, of attempting to use Anglo-Saxon idioms for Russian characters, which always fails awfully. The greatly under-rated American story writer William Saroyan wrote of 'the roar of Dostoyevsky'. This Dover Thrift edition really captures this aspect of the great Russian author. Much of the text is composed of speech, whilst the rest often reads like it. There is nothing mannered or affected about the style, but there is a profound sense of immediacy, as well as a surprising sense of humour. As well as being a well-translated great novel, the Dover Thrift edition has a large print size that is easy to read, and an attractive layout. Now that the British media is overly-populated by anti-religious bigmouths, ostentatiously beating old strawmen (whilst avoiding the problem of evil and free will), I'd say that Dostoyevsky is more relevant than ever. His anti-religious characters tend to be more interesting than most of their real life counterparts.show more
by Gregor Matheson