A Brief History of Slavery
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A Brief History of Slavery

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A thought-provoking and important book that raises essential issues crucial not only for our past but also the present day. In this panoramic history, Jeremy Black tells how slavery was first developed in the ancient world, and reaches all the way to present day and the contemporary crimes of trafficking and bonded labour. He shows how slavery has taken many forms throughout history and across the world - from the uprising of Spartacus, the plantations of the Indies, and the murderous forced labour of the gulags and concentration camps. Slavery helped consolidated transoceanic empires and helped mould new world societies such as America and Brazil. In the Atlantic trade, Black also looks at the controversial area of how complicit the African peoples were in the trade. He then charts the long fight for abolition in the 19th century, including both the campaigners as well as the lost voices of the slaves themselves who spoke of their misery. Finally, as Black points out, slavery has not been completely abolished today and coerced labour can be found closer to home than is comfortable.

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  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 128 x 196 x 26mm | 281.23g
  • 18 Aug 2011
  • Little, Brown Book Group
  • Robinson Publishing
  • London
  • English
  • 1849016895
  • 9781849016896
  • 184,678

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Author Information

Jeremy Black is, according to Andrew Roberts, the most underrated historian in Britain. MBE and Professor of History at Exeter University. He is the author of over 100 books and is one of the most respected military historians in the world. He is a Member of the Council of the Royal Historical Society.

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Review quote

A truly horrifying account of human cruelty. Catholic Herald A thought-provoking and important book that raises essential issues crucial not only for our past but also the present day. Spartacus Review

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