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    Brave New World Revisited (Paperback) By (author) Aldous Huxley, Introduction by David Bradshaw

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    DescriptionIn his 1932 classic dystopian novel, "Brave New World", Aldous Huxley depicted a future society in thrall to science and regulated by sophisticated methods of social control. Nearly thirty years later in "Brave New World Revisited", Huxley checked the progress of his prophecies against reality and argued that many of his fictional fantasies had grown uncomfortably close to the truth. "Brave New World Revisited" includes Huxley's views on overpopulation, propaganda, advertising and government control, and is an urgent and powerful appeal for the defence of individualism still alarmingly relevant today.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Brave New World Revisited

    Title
    Brave New World Revisited
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Aldous Huxley, Introduction by David Bradshaw
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 176
    Width: 129 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 12 mm
    Weight: 134 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099458234
    ISBN 10: 0099458233
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21500
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2AB
    DC22: 823.912
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S3.0
    BIC E4L: SOC
    BIC subject category V2: DNF, JFFR
    BISAC V2.8: FIC004000
    BIC subject category V2: 2AB
    Publisher
    VINTAGE
    Imprint name
    VINTAGE
    Publication date
    02 September 2004
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Aldous Huxley was born on 26th July 1894 near Godalming, Surrey. He began writing poetry and short stories in his early twenties, but it was his first novel, Crome Yellow (1921), which established his literary reputation. This was swiftly followed by Antic Hay (1923), Those Barren Leaves (1925) and Point Counter Point (1928) - bright, brilliant satires in which Huxley wittily but ruthlessly passed judgement on the shortcomings of contemporary society. The great novels of ideas, including his most famous work Brave New World (published in 1932 this warned against the dehumanising aspects of scientific and material 'progress') and the pacifist novel Eyeless in Gaza (1936) were accompanied by a series of wise and brilliant essays, collected in volume form under titles such as Music at Night (1931) and Ends and Means (1937). In 1937, at the height of his fame, Huxley left Europe to live in California, working for a time as a screenwriter in Hollywood. As the West braced itself for war, Huxley came increasingly to believe that the key to solving the world's problems lay in changing the individual through mystical enlightenment. The exploration of the inner life through mysticism and hallucinogenic drugs was to dominate his work for the rest of his life. His beliefs found expression in both fiction (Time Must Have a Stop, 1944 and Island, 1962) and non-fiction (The Perennial Philosophy, 1945, Grey Eminence, 1941 and the famous account of his first mescalin experience, The Doors of Perception, 1954. Huxley died in California on 22nd November 1963.
    Review quote
    "A brilliant tour de force, Brave New World may be read as a grave warning of the pitfalls that await uncontrolled scientific advance. Full of barbed wit and malice-spiked frankness. Provoking, stimulating, shocking and dazzling" Observer "Such ingenious wit, derisive logic and swiftness of expression, Huxley's resources of sardonic invention have never been more brilliantly displayed" The Times "A fantastical look at the world in the future which made me look differently at the present" -- Katie Melua Observer "Lucid and well-reasoned...one is captivated by Huxley's knowledge and his even more extraordinary intelligence" Sunday Times