The Biomechanics of Back Pain

The Biomechanics of Back Pain

Hardback

By (author) Michael A. Adams, By (author) Kim Burton, By (author) Patricia Dolan, By (author) Nikolai Bogduk

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  • Publisher: CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE
  • Format: Hardback | 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 188mm x 244mm x 18mm | 721g
  • Publication date: 16 October 2006
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0443100683
  • ISBN 13: 9780443100680
  • Edition: 2, Revised
  • Edition statement: 2nd Revised edition
  • Illustrations note: Approx. 200 illustrations
  • Sales rank: 457,295

Product description

This book offers an up-to-date review of the latest research in the field of mechanical back pain. It covers ground not previously covered in books (just published in journal articles and so inaccessible to many practitioners). It is written at a level appropriate for clinicians and undergraduates. It is fully illustrated with high-quality colour photographs of the relevant pathology as well as line diagrams to illustrate the biomechanics. The book provides the 'missing link' in the wealth of literature available on back pain. Back pain affects a large percentage of the population at some time and its effective management has a significant effect on the health and employment economy and on the workload of manual therapy practitioners and orthopaedic surgeons. In order to plan treatment and management effectively, it is important to understand the underlying biomechanics. This book provides the basis for that understanding. It is written by four of the foremost researchers in the field (all well known internationally through their research, publications and international speaking). They are a multidisciplinary team representing some of the main market groups.

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Author information

I commenced research into spinal pain, in 1972, when essentially nothing was known about the problem. There being no established groups or departments working on this problem, I forged my own career, using borrowed resources. I commenced in a Department of Anatomy, where I pursued the innervation of the vertebral column as a fundamental element in understanding the sources and mechanisms of spinal pain. Professor Jim Lance fostered this interest, and accommodated my PhD studies. In his department I continued my anatomy studies but was able also to commence clinical applications. I developed and tested new diagnostic and surgical procedures for back pain and for neck pain. While in Professor Lance's Department, I participated in laboratory studies of the mechanisms of migraine. At the University of Queensland I continued to develop and apply the diagnostic and surgical techniques that I started at the University of NSW, serving as an honorary medical officer at the Pain Clinic of Princess Alexandra Hospital. Meanwhile I supervised science and medicine postgraduate students who undertook basic science studies into the biomechanics of the back and neck. At the University of Newcastle, I had established a reputation sufficient to attract a grant from the Motor Accidents Authority of NSW to investigate the cause and treatment of neck pain after whiplash. The grant supported three PhD students over a six year period. They performed studies that validated the diagnostic procedures and which tested the surgical procedures in a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized trial. Having established an international standing in the development and testing of treatments for spinal pain, I participated in the design and analysis of controlled trials conducted elsewhere in Australia and in the USA. These tested the efficacy of: lumbar radiofrequency neurotomy for back pain, intradiscal electrothermal anuloplasty for back pain, prolotherapy for back pain, exercises for neck pain. Between 1997 and 2002 I conducted the National Musculoskeletal Medicine Initiative which developed and tested evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, knee pain, and pain in the foot, wrist, and elbow. My work has been awarded the Volvo Award for Back Pain Research, the Research Prize of the Cervical Spine Research Society, the Award for Outstanding Research of the North American Spine Society, and three times the Research Prize of the Spine Society of Australia. My students have been awarded research prizes by the International Association for the Study of Pain, the Australian Rheumatology Association, and the Australian New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. I have never had a funded department to which to attract investigators and academics. I have relied on scholarships for students, and the goodwill of private practitioners who wished to contribute to clinical research. Of late, I have been supervising Neurosurgery residents undertaking studies of the outcomes of treatment for Radicular pain and back pain.

Table of contents

Plates 1-6 1. Introduction 2. The Lumbar Vertebral Column and Sacrum 3. Muscles and Fascia of the Lumbar Spine 4. Nerves and Blood Supply to the Lumbar Spine 5. Low Back Pain 6. Epidemiology of Low Back Trouble 7. Biology of Spinal Tissues 8. Growth and Aging of the Lumbar Spine-NEW! 9. Forces Acting on the Lumbar Spine 10. Mechanical Function of the Lumbosacral Spine 11. Mechanical Damage to the Lumbar Spine 12. Functional Pathology 13. Spinal Degeneration-NEW! 14. Preventing Back Pain 15. Conservative Management of Back Pain-NEW! 16. Biomechanics of Spinal Surgery-NEW! 17. Surgery for Disc Prolapse, Spinal Stenosis and Back Pain-NEW! 18. Medico-Legal Considerations 19. Summary: Spinal Aging, Degeneration and Pain References Index