Bikenomics: How Bicycling Will Save the Economy (If We Let it)

Bikenomics: How Bicycling Will Save the Economy (If We Let it)

Paperback Bicycle

By (author) Elly Blue

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  • Publisher: Microcosm Publishing
  • Format: Paperback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 127mm x 201mm x 18mm | 113g
  • Publication date: 20 March 2014
  • Publication City/Country: Bloomington, IN
  • ISBN 10: 1621060039
  • ISBN 13: 9781621060031
  • Sales rank: 144,845

Product description

Making the case for adopting more sustainable modes of transportation, this engaging reference explores the economic benefits of bicycling. It starts with an analysis of the real costs incurred by individuals and families in existing transportation systems and goes on to examine the current civic expenses of these systems. With critiques of modern society's deep-rooted attachment to car culture, this book tells the stories of people, businesses, organizations, and cities who are investing in two-wheeled transportation. Offering a fresh and compelling perspective on how people get from place to place, this book reveals the multifaceted North American bicycle movement with its contradictions, challenges, successes, and visions for the future.

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Author information

Elly Blue is the author of "Everyday Bicycling" and her work has appeared on Bicycling.com and in "BikePortland," "Bitch Magazine," "Grist Magazine," "Momentum "magazine, and "Reclaim Magazine." She has been featured on "Democracy Now!," Oregon Public Broadcasting, and in the "Oregonian," and she blogs about bicycling and empowerment at www.TakingTheLane.com. She lives in Portland, Oregon.

Review quote

"Blue's book helped me better frame my own reasons for riding, and got me thinking a lot about what a more bike-centered future could look like. It's a future, I realized, I'd really like to see." --Dick VanderHart, "Portland Mercury"