• Between the Woods and the Water See large image

    Between the Woods and the Water (New York Review Books Classics) (Paperback) By (author) Patrick Leigh Fermor, Introduction by Professor Jan Morris

    Hard to find title available from Book Depository

    $11.64 - Save $4.31 27% off - RRP $15.95 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionContinuing the epic foot journey across Europe begun in "A Time of Gifts" The journey that Patrick Leigh Fermor set out on in 1933--to cross Europe on foot with an emergency allowance of one pound a day--proved so rich in experiences that when much later he sat down to describe them, they overflowed into more than one volume. Undertaken as the storms of war gathered, and providing a background for the events that were beginning to unfold in Central Europe, Leigh Fermor's still-unfinished account of his journey has established itself as a modern classic. "Between the Woods and the Water," the second volume of a projected three, has garnered as many prizes as its celebrated predecessor, "A Time of Gifts." The opening of the book finds Leigh Fermor crossing the Danube--at the very moment where his first volume left off. A detour to the luminous splendors of Prague is followed by a trip downriver to Budapest, passage on horseback across the Great Hungarian Plain, and a crossing of the Romanian border into Transylvania. Remote castles, mountain villages, monasteries and towering ranges that are the haunt of bears, wolves, eagles, gypsies, and a variety of sects are all savored in the approach to the Iron Gates, the division between the Carpathian mountains and the Balkans, where, for now, the story ends.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for Between the Woods and the Water

    Title
    Between the Woods and the Water
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Patrick Leigh Fermor, Introduction by Professor Jan Morris
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 264
    Width: 127 mm
    Height: 201 mm
    Thickness: 13 mm
    Weight: 272 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781590171660
    ISBN 10: 1590171667
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: TRG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T14.3
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1D
    BIC subject category V2: WTH
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    LC subject heading:
    Libri: I-TT
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    LC subject heading:
    B&T General Subject: 800
    B&T Merchandise Category: TVL
    Ingram Subject Code: TT
    BISAC V2.8: TRV010000
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 06
    BISAC V2.8: TRV009000
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 23000
    DC22: 914.96
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 914.96
    LC classification: DJK76.4 .F47 2005
    LC subject heading: ,
    Publisher
    The New York Review of Books, Inc
    Imprint name
    The New York Review of Books, Inc
    Publication date
    10 October 2005
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) was an intrepid traveler, a heroic soldier, and a writer with a unique prose style. After his stormy schooldays, followed by the walk across Europe to Constantinople that begins in "A Time of Gifts" (1977) and continues through "Between the Woods and the Water" (1986), he lived and traveled in the Balkans and the Greek Archipelago. His books "Mani" (1958) and "Roumeli" (1966) attest to his deep interest in languages and remote places. In the Second World War he joined the Irish Guards, became a liaison officer in Albania, and fought in Greece and Crete. He was awarded the DSO and OBE. He lived partly in Greece--in the house he designed with his wife, Joan, in an olive grove in the Mani--and partly in Worcestershire. He was knighted in 2004 for his services to literature and to British-Greek relations. Jan Morris was born in 1926, is Anglo-Welsh, and lives in Wales. She has written some forty books, including the Pax Britannica trilogy about the British Empire; studies of Wales, Spain, Venice, Oxford, Manhattan, Sydney, Hong Kong, and Trieste; six volumes of collected travel essays; two memoirs; two capricious biographies; and a couple of novels--but she defines her entire oeuvre as "disguised autobiography." She is an honorary D.Litt. of the University of Wales and a Commander of the British Empire. Her memoir "Conundrum" is available as a New York Review Book Classic.
    Review quote
    "Those for whom Paddy's prose is still an undiscovered country are to be envied for what lies ahead-hours with one of the most buoyant and curious personalities one can find in English." -- "The New York Sun" "Mr. Fermor...is a peerless companion, unbound by timetable or convention, relentless in his high spirits and curiosity." -- "The New York Times" "We are aware at every step that his adventure can never be duplicated: only this extraordinary person at this pivotal time could have experienced and recorded many of these sights. Distant lightening from events in Germany weirdly illuminates the trail of this free spirit." -- "The New York Times" "The young Fermor appears to have been as delightful a traveling companion as the much older Fermor a raconteur." -- "The Houston Chronicle" "["A Time of Gifts," "Between the Woods and the Water"] are absolutely delightful volumes, both for those who want to better understand what was lost in the violence of Europe's 20th-century divisions and for those who appreciate the beauty and thrill of travel writing at its best." -- "The Houston Chronicle" "Leigh Fermor is recognizably that figure many writers of the past century have yearned to be, the man of action." -- "The Guardian" "He was, and remains, an Englishman, with so much living to his credit that the lives conducted by the rest of us seem barely sentient-pinched and paltry things, laughably provincial in their scope, and no more fruitful than sleepwalks. We fret about our kids' S.A.T. scores, whereas this man, when he was barely more than a kid himself, shouldered a rucksack and walked from Rotterdam to Istanbul." -- Anthony Lane, "The New Yorker" "Even more magical...through Hungary, its lost province of Transylvania, and into Romania...sampling the tail end of a languid, urbane and anglophile way of life that would soon be swept away forever." --Jeremy Lewis, "Literary Review" "In these two volumes of extr