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    The Basque History of the World (Paperback) By (author) Mark Kurlansky

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    DescriptionThe Basques are Europe's oldest people, their origins a mystery, their language related to no other on Earth, and even though few in population and from a remote and rugged corner of Spain and France, they have had a profound impact on the world. Whilst inward-looking, preserving their ancient language and customs, the Basques also struck out for new horizons, pioneers of whaling and cod fishing, leading the way in exploration of the Americas and Asia, were among the first capitalists and later led Southern Europe's industrial revolution. Mark Kurlansky, the author of the acclaimed Cod, blends human stories with economic, political, literary and culinary history to paint a fascinating picture of an intriguing people.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Basque History of the World

    Title
    The Basque History of the World
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Mark Kurlansky
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 400
    Width: 128 mm
    Height: 196 mm
    Thickness: 32 mm
    Weight: 381 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099284130
    ISBN 10: 0099284138
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15500
    BIC subject category V2: HBG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC subject category V2: HBTB
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DSE
    Libri: B-344
    LC subject heading:
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    Ingram Theme: CULT/WEUROP
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET050
    Ingram Theme: CULT/FRANCE
    BISAC V2.8: HIS045000, HIS010020
    DC21: 909.049992
    BIC subject category V2: 1DSE
    DC22: 946.6
    Thema V1.0: NHB, NHTB, NHD
    Thema geographical qualifier V1.0: 1DSE, 1DSP
    Illustrations note
    illustrations, maps
    Publisher
    VINTAGE
    Imprint name
    VINTAGE
    Publication date
    02 November 2000
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Mark Kurlansky is the author of several bestselling non-fiction titles including Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World (winner of the Glenfiddich Best Food Book Award), The Basque History of the World, Salt: A World History, 1968: The Year that Rocked the World, a short story collection The White Man in the Tree and a novel, Boogaloo on 2nd Avenue.
    Review quote
    The Basques are Europe's oldest people, their origins a mystery, their language related to no other on Earth, and even though few in population and from a remote and rugged corner of Spain and France, they have had a profound impact on the world. Whilst inward-looking, preserving their ancient language and customs, the Basques also struck out for new horizons, pioneers of whaling and cod fishing, leading the way in exploration of the Americas and Asia, were among the first capitalists and later led Southern Europe's industrial revolution. Mark Kurlansky, the author of the acclaimed Cod, blends human stories with economic, political, literary and culinary history to paint a fascinating picture of an intriguing people.
    Review text
    A comprehensive view of all things Basque, from the author of Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (1997). The Basque History of the World is an honorable title, alerting readers to its singularly Basque-centric mix of cultural studies, history, and politics. The writing is direct and accessible, although limited by the occasional descriptive cliche ("jagged mountains" and "crisp fall days"). It's most interesting when describing the periods when Basque history intersects with the history of the larger world. For example, in a section on the Spanish Civil War, Kurlansky utilizes quotes from survivors of the 1937 bombing of Guernica by Franco's forces, the first large-scale use of air power against a civilian population, to create a sense of suspense, dread, and terror. The bravery of members of the Basque underground, who helped over 700 downed Allied fliers escape from Nazi-occupied territory to England during WWII, is also depicted through compelling first-person recollections. The last third of the book, covering the post-WWII period and the radicalization of a faction of the Basque independence movement, is most problematic. While Kurlansky adeptly explains the logic for Basque autonomy and presents the most radical wings' justification for its historical use of terrorism, his analysis too often accepts the Basque view at face value and offers no independent perspective. Perhaps this is because Kurlansky is enamored of his subject, especially the Basque language, Euskera. Euskera warrants attention, as it's a unique non-Indo-European language with no known linguistic relatives. Kurlansky knows the Basques well and includes many entertaining anecdotes, myths, and facts about them, all of which reflect a quaint Basque chauvinism. According to the author, the Basque are: probably the original Europeans, the first Europeans to cultivate tobacco, the first bankers in Spain, the most devout Catholics in the world, and among the inventors of beach resorts. In its entirety, this is an informative but ethnocentric history that readers should approach with their critical faculties intact. (Kirkus Reviews)