BackTrack 4: Assuring Security by Penetration Testing

BackTrack 4: Assuring Security by Penetration Testing

By (author) Shakeel Ali , By (author) Tedi Heriyanto

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Written as an interactive tutorial, this book covers the core of BackTrack with real-world examples and step-by-step instructions to provide professional guidelines and recommendations to you. The book is designed in a simple and intuitive manner, which allows you to explore the whole BackTrack testing process or study parts of it individually. If you are an IT security professional or network administrator who has a basic knowledge of Unix/Linux operating systems including awareness of information security factors, and you want to use BackTrack for penetration testing, then this book is for you.

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  • Paperback | 392 pages
  • 208 x 272 x 28mm | 1,061.4g
  • 19 Apr 2011
  • Packt Publishing Limited
  • Birmingham
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1849513945
  • 9781849513944
  • 344,284

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Author Information

Shakeel Ali is a main founder and CTO of Cipher Storm Ltd, UK. His expertise in the security industry markedly exceeds the standard number of security assessments, compliance, governance, and forensic projects that he carries in day-to-day operations. As a senior security evangelist and having spent endless nights without taking a nap, he provides constant security support to various businesses and government institutions globally. He is an active independent researcher who writes various articles, whitepapers, and manages a blog at Ethical-Hacker.net. He regularly participates in BugCon Security Conferences, Mexico, to highlight the best-of-breed cyber security threats and their solutions from practically driven countermeasures. Tedi Heriyanto currently works as a Senior Technical Consultant in an Indonesian information technology company. He has worked with several well-known institutions in Indonesia and overseas, in designing secure network architecture, deploying and managing enterprise-wide security systems, developing information security policies and procedures, doing information security audit and assessment, and giving information security awareness training. In his spare times, he manages to research, write various articles, participate in Indonesian Security Community activities, and maintain a blog site. He has shared his knowledge in information security by writing several information security and computer programming books.

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Customer reviews

Assuring Security by Penetration Testing

This review is from: BackTrack 4: Assuring Security by Penetration Testing (Paperback) The authors tackle a persistent danger to many websites and networks that hang off the Internet, where often the complexity of the operating systems and applications and the interactions between these can open doors to attackers. So the basic idea of penetration testing is to preemptively probe ('attack') your system. Find the weaknesses first, before others do so. In part, the text offers a good overview of the field, separate from the usages of BackTrack. So you get a summary of several common security testing methodologies. Including the Open Source Security Testing Methodology Manual. If you have a background in science experiments, you'll see clear parallels in how this OSSTMM approach investigates an unknown system. As far as BackTrack is concerned, its capabilities are explored in depth through most of the text. It does seem to have covered all the bases. Like checking/scanning for open TCP and UDP ports on target machines. Or looking for live machines on a network. One thing that becomes clear is that you can treat BackTrack as a repertoire of free tools. And you can pick just a subset of these tools to initially use against your network, if you have specific needs or suspicions, To be sure, the recommended usage is a top down one, where you treat BackTrack as an integrated whole and you systematically first plan out your entire testing. No argument from me. You should do this, if you decide to use BackTrack in the first place. But a pragmatic incremental approach might still have some nuopelnas. Where you can just choose a tool and look up its usage in the text and run it. Easy to get some experience and confidence.show more
by Dainius Valatka