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Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation

Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation

Hardback

By (author) Tyler Cowen

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  • Publisher: E P Dutton & Co Inc
  • Format: Hardback | 290 pages
  • Dimensions: 148mm x 232mm x 30mm | 499g
  • Publication date: 30 September 2013
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0525953736
  • ISBN 13: 9780525953739
  • Sales rank: 37,851

Product description

Widely acclaimed as one of the world's most influential economists, Tyler Cowen returns with his groundbreaking follow-up to the "New York Times" bestseller "The Great Stagnation." The widening gap between rich and poor means dealing with one big, uncomfortable truth: If you're not at the top, you're at the bottom. The global labor market is changing radically thanks to growth at the high end--and the low. About three quarters of the jobs created in the United States since the great recession pay only a bit more than minimum wage. Still, the United States has more millionaires and billionaires than any country ever, and we continue to mint them. In this eye-opening book, renowned economist and bestselling author Tyler Cowen explains that phenomenon: High earners are taking ever more advantage of machine intelligence in data analysis and achieving ever-better results. Meanwhile, low earners who haven't committed to learning, to making the most of new technologies, have poor prospects. Nearly every business sector relies less and less on manual labor, and this fact is forever changing the world of work and wages. A steady, secure life somewhere in the middle--average--is over. With The Great Stagnation, Cowen explained why median wages stagnated over the last four decades; in "Average Is Over "he reveals the essential nature of the new economy, identifies the best path forward for workers and entrepreneurs, and provides readers with actionable advice to make the most of the new economic landscape. It is a challenging and sober must-read but ultimately exciting, good news. In debates about our nation's economic future, it will be impossible to ignore.

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Author information

TYLER COWEN is a professor of economics at George Mason University. His blog, Marginal Revolution, is one of the world's most influential economics blogs. He also writes for the "New York Times, ""Financial Times" and "The Economist" and is the cofounder of Marginal Revolution University. The author of five previous books, Cowen lives in Fairfax, Virginia.

Review quote

Praise for "Average is Over" "A buckle-your-seatbelts, swiftly moving tour of the new economic landscape." - "Kirkus Reviews" "Cowen has a single core strength...his taste for observations that are genuinely enlightening, interesting, and underappreciated." - "The Daily Beast ""A bracing new book" - "The Economist" "Tyler Cowen's new book "Average is Over "makes an excellent followup to his previous work "The Great Stagnation "and I expect it will set the intellectual agenda in much the way its predecessor did." - "Slate" "The author roves broadly and interestingly to make his case, outlining radical economic transformations that lie in store for us, predicting the rise and fall of cities depending on their capacity to adapt to this machine-driven world and offering policy prescriptions for preserving American prosperity." - "The Wall Street Journal" "Audacious and fascinating." - "The Financial Times" "Thomas Friedman - move over. There's a new guy on the block." - "Tampa Bay Tribune" "Eminently readable." - The Brookings Institute "Cowen has a rare ability to present fundamental economic questions without all of the complexity and jargon that make many economics books inaccessible to the lay reader." - "The American Interest"