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A master of the interplay between politics and psychology, Richard Sennett here analyzes the nature, the role, and the faces of authority-authority in personal life, in the public realm, authority as an idea. Why have we become so afraid of authority? What real needs for authority do we have-for guidance, stability, images of strength? What happens when our fear of and our need for authority come into conflict? In exploring these questions, Sennett examines traditional forms of authority (The father's in the family, the lord's in society) and the dominant contemporary styles of authority, and he shows how our needs for, no less than our resistance to, authority have been shaped by history and culture, as well as by psychological disposition.

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  • Paperback | 206 pages
  • 139.7 x 213.36 x 17.78mm | 294.83g
  • WW Norton & Co
  • New YorkUnited States
  • English
  • Reissue
  • black & white illustrations
  • 0393310272
  • 9780393310276
  • 443,709

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This book is a study of both how we experience authority and how we might experience it differently. Sennett explores the bonds that rebellion against authority paradoxically establishes, showing how this paradox has been in the making since the French Revolution and how today it expresses itself in offices, in factories, and in government as well as in the family.

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About Richard Sennett

Richard Sennett teaches sociology at the London School of Economics and New York University

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