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    At Large: The Case of the World's Biggest Internet Invasion (Paperback) By (author) David H. Freedman, By (author) Charles C. Mann

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    DescriptionHailed as "a chilling portrait" by The Boston Globe and "a crafty thriller" by Newsweek, this astonishing story of an obsessive hacker promises to change the way you look at the Internet forever. "At Large" chronicles the massive manhunt that united hard-nosed FBI agents, computer nerds, and uptight security bureaucrats against an elusive computer outlaw who broke into highly secured computer systems at banks, universities, federal agencies, and top-secret military weapons-research sites. Here is "a real-life tale of cops vs. hackers, by two technology writers with a flair for turning a complicated crime and investigation into a fast-moving edge-of-your-seat story" (Kirkus Reviews, starred). "At Large" blows the lid off the frightening vulnerability of the global online network, which leaves not only systems, but also individuals, exposed.


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  • Full bibliographic data for At Large

    Title
    At Large
    Subtitle
    The Case of the World's Biggest Internet Invasion
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) David H. Freedman, By (author) Charles C. Mann
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 320
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 216 mm
    Thickness: 17 mm
    Weight: 404 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780684835587
    ISBN 10: 0684835584
    Classifications

    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1KBB
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2ABM
    BIC E4L: CRI
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T18.1
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC21: 364.168
    BIC subject category V2: BTC
    DC22: 364.168
    B&T General Subject: 229
    B&T Merchandise Category: COM
    Ingram Subject Code: XB
    BISAC V2.8: TRU000000, COM060000
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 26360
    BISAC V2.8: COM000000
    BIC subject category V2: URY, URH
    B&T Approval Code: A93663052
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC22: 364.16/8/0973
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: HV6773.2 .F74 1998, 97-960
    Thema V1.0: DNXC, URH, URY
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Illustrations note
    black & white illustrations
    Publisher
    SIMON & SCHUSTER
    Imprint name
    TOUCHSTONE
    Publication date
    03 June 1998
    Publication City/Country
    New York, NY
    Review quote
    Jon Katz The New York Times Book Review Freedman and Mann understand technology, computers, and security issues. Their message in "At Large" is clear and convincing.
    Review text
    A real-life tale of cops vs. hackers, by two technology writers with a flair for turning a complicated crime and investigation into a fast-moving, edge-of-your-seat story. Freedman (Brainmakers, 1994) and Mann (coauthor, Noah's Choice, 1995) tell the tale of a reclusive teenage hacker, alternatively dubbed Phantomd and Infomaster, who hopscotches around the Internet, breaking into systems and generally wreaking havoc online; his "absurd, dangerous, monomaniacal course" of trespassing on computer networks causes even his hacker cronies to fear him. With incisive descriptions and prose that's never overburdened by jargon, the authors chronicle the progression of Phantomd's online intrusions from university computers to Intel to top-secret government databases, and the federal investigation that finally nabs him. Unfortunately, the story loses steam at the end, when the FBI inexplicably decides not to have him prosecuted. Still, the book works because of the authors' skill at portraying their characters and building suspense and momentum from online events that are difficult to visualize. The best character, by far, is Phantomd himself, a disabled and massively antisocial youth who is capable of spending days at a time at his computer. As the hacker gets deeper and deeper into trouble, his brother tries futilely to save him, and the book takes on the dimensions of an information-age tragedy. Phantomd's last line, in particular, is heartbreaking, a testament to how the writers deftly recruit the reader's sympathy for the story's antagonist. Finally, the book becomes a portent: The authors make a strong case for the vulnerability of the Internet, describing its "electronic Maginot lines" and their inadequacy in the face of patient young invaders with powerful tools. With this extraordinary story and its hard-learned lessons, the authors should make more than a few of their readers wary of staking their privacy on the online world. (Kirkus Reviews)